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Ween Debuts Jimi Hendrix “Are You Experienced?” Cover At Dallas Halloween Show [Full Video]

first_imgFresh of their big Sunday performance at this past weekend’s Suwannee Hulaween, Ween rolled into Dallas, TX to celebrate All Hallows Eve at The Bomb Factory. The 32-song performance featured a mix of frequently-played favorites like “Spinal Meningitis”, “Touch My Tooter”, “Buckingham Green”, “Doctor Rock”, “Waving My Dick In The Wind”, “Bananas and Blow”, “Piss Up A Rope”, “Mister Richard Smoker”, and “Roses Are Free” and relative rarities like “How High Can You Fly?”, “The Stallion pt. 1”, “I Play It Off Legit”, “Don’t Laugh (I Love You)”, “Boy’s Club”, and “I’m Holding You”, as well as a set-closing cover of Motorhead‘s “Ace of Spades”.All but one of the songs played on Hallo-Ween night had been played at least once before in 2017, but the outlier was a doozy: a debut cover of The Jimi Hendrix Experience‘s “Are You Experienced?” featuring Dean Ween (dressed Dr. Rock) on vocals and Gene Ween (as a long-haired King Freeman in red robes) on keys, and a badass “Third Stone From The Sun” outro.Watch fan-shot side-stage video of Ween covering “Are You Experienced?” below via YouTube User monihampton:You can watch full show crowd-shot video of Ween Halloween at The Bomb Factory below via YouTube user Terrence Henry:Tomorrow, Thursday, November 2nd, Ween moves along in Texas for a two-night run at Stubb’s in Austin. For more info, head to the band’s website.SETLIST: Ween | The Bomb Factory | Dallas, TX | 10/31/17The Golden Eel, Ice Castles, Spinal Meningitis (Got Me Down), How High Can You Fly?, The Stallion pt 1, I Can’t Put My Finger on It, Touch My Tooter, I Play It Off Legit, Freedom of ’76, Beacon Light, Buckingham Green, Did You See Me?, The Argus, What Deaner Was Talkin’ About, Object, Even If You Don’t, Are You Experienced?, Doctor Rock, Waving My Dick in the Wind, Bananas and Blow, Piss Up a Rope, Push th’ Little Daisies, Don’t Laugh (I Love You), Demon Sweat, You Fucked Up> Tick, Mister Richard Smoker, Boy’s Club, Ace of SpadesEncore: Roses Are Free, I’m Holding You, Buenas Tardes Amigo– souncheck: Light Me Up– Gene on keys for Are You Experienced? – with Third Stone From the Sun outro– Dean on bass, Dave on guitar for Don’t Laugh– Gene on keys for Demon Sweat[Cover photo via YouTube user monihampton]last_img read more

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Tom Hamilton, Holly Bowling, & More Announce Spring Tour With New Band, Ghost Light

first_imgBrand new year, brand new band: Holly Bowling, Tom Hamilton, and more have come together to form a fresh project, dubbed Ghost Light. The new band, which also features Steve Lyons, Raina Mullen, and Scotty Zwang, has announced its official emergence, as well as the first leg of their debut tour. Their spring tour will kick off March 20th in San Diego, CA, and feature shows in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Washington DC and more.The first half of 2018 will see the band playing major venues in major markets coast to coast, followed by heavy rotation on the festival circuit. The debut record will be released in the second half of the year, and will be supported by an extensive tour. In 2018, you will get to know Ghost Light, and the future seems bright.Ghost Light is a true musical collaboration; five personalities, five perspectives, and five unique approaches towards one common sound. Rather than initially focusing on live shows, as many new groups do, the band played together for the first time in a recording studio in Philadelphia. This decision gave the band the ability to come to the project with fresh ears and no pre-conceived notions. They developed the songs as they developed their musical communication, which led to trust, creativity and an adventurous take on the process. As Scotty Zwang explains in a press release about the new band, “It’s a unique and interesting approach we get to take…we are being patient with each other and figuring out what the song needs.”“Having played with everyone involved in a live setting before, I had a pretty firm grasp of what we all brought to the table and it was exciting”, says Hamilton. “There is a wonderful freedom that comes with knowing that you don’t have to carry the entire load over the finish line. So when Raina and I were workshopping ideas to bring to this new band, we felt super comfortable going in any direction, knowing that with our new bandmates, the songs will get to where they needs to go. And in the live setting, that confidence is just as strong.”Although Ghost Light took their first steps in the studio rather than on the stage, the live experience is what will define this band. “In the parts of the sessions where we have had a little more room to just let things go, there have been these little glimmers of what the improvisation will feel like live. That’s a whole other thing and it’s very exciting,” notes Bowling.The band has yet to release any music, but members of the group have played together numerous times. While we wait for music from this new band, listen to Tom Hamilton and Holly Bowling (and Don Was and Duane Trucks) join Bob Weir  at Christmas Jam 2016 below (uploaded by JamBuzz; audio via taper nolamule):Check out a full list of Ghost Light tour dates below. All shows will go on-sale tomorrow, Friday January 12th at Noon local time. You can find ticket links for specific shows at www.ghostlightband.com.INITIAL GHOST LIGHT TOUR DATES:March 20th – Winstons – San Diego, CAMarch 21st – The Mint – Los Angeles, CAMarch 23rd & 24th – Terrapin Crossroads – San Rafael, CAMarch 27th – Humboldt Brews – Arcata, CAMarch 28th – HiFi Lounge – Eugene, ORMarch 29th – Volcanic Theater Pub – Bend, ORMarch 30th – Mission Theater – Portland, ORApril 11th – Brooklyn Bowl – Brooklyn, NYApril 12th – Ardmore Music Hall – Ardmore, PAApril 13th – The Acoustic – Bridgeport, CTApril 14th – Thunder Road – Boston, MAApril 17th – Gypsy Sally’s – Washington, DCApril 18th – Lincoln Theater – Raleigh, NCApril 19th – 5 Points Sanctuary – Roanoke, VAApril 20th – Asheville Music Hall – Asheville, NC[Cover Photo via www.ghostlightband.com]last_img read more

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Giving thanks to each other

first_imgIt’s common to show appreciation for family, friends, and good health come November, but co-workers often get short shrift when it comes to Thanksgiving gratitude. This week, the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) is giving its staff the opportunity to celebrate their colleagues just in time for the holidays.Starting today (Nov. 16), FAS Human Resources is hosting its first Giving Thanks Open House, a three-day event that will allow FAS employees to appreciate one another for the little things they do each day.FAS staff can acknowledge their bosses, employees, or co-workers by writing personal notes of thanks on blank note cards handed out at the open house. The notes will be delivered by Harvard mail staff throughout the week of Thanksgiving.The open house will take place today and Thursday (Nov. 18) from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the University Hall Faculty Room. On Wednesday, the reception will be held in the Northwest Science Building, Room 453, for staff housed on the other side of campus. Seasonal refreshments will be provided.Guests are also encouraged to bring nonperishable food items or a monetary donation to benefit the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter. All charitable contributions will be managed by the Community Gifts Through Harvard program, and individual contributors will be acknowledged.Staff had already begun to mingle on Tuesday morning. Katie Phelan, a trainer in FAS Office of Finance’s Administrative Systems Assistance Program, stopped in to write notes to her close co-workers and “a few people I don’t see very often,” she said. “I’m grateful that not only do they do great work, but they do it with a sense of humor.”Kean Hsu and Nate Moran, both identity management analysts at FAS Computer Services, dropped in to make donations of food and money and to write letters.“I’m lucky to have a job where I like my co-workers, I’m appreciated, and I’m actually able to get stuff done, to be productive,” Hsu said. “That’s a rare combination these days.”Creating holiday traditions like this week’s event helps to strengthen workplace culture at FAS, said Chris Ciotti, associate dean for human resources at FAS. In addition to Giving Thanks, FAS also gave its first Dean’s Distinction Awards earlier this year to honor 50 outstanding employees.“This event gives us an opportunity to create a new FAS tradition and provides us with a meaningful way to recognize staff and celebrate their contributions to their colleagues,” Ciotti said. “The first FAS Giving Thanks event also provides FAS staff a chance to give back to the community by making a contribution to the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter.”last_img read more

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‘Sisterhood of the traveling pantsuit’

first_imgFifty years ago, when America was unquestionably a man’s world, one small but influential part of it officially opened its doors to women: the M.B.A. program at Harvard Business School (HBS).On Thursday, about 800 of the School’s roughly 11,000 alumnae — including some of those intrepid early graduates — descended on the Allston campus for the start of the W50 Summit, two days of reflection, celebration, and brainstorming on women’s experiences at HBS and beyond.They heard from panels of professors and alumni on everything from the benefits of “power-posing” and the perils of sleeping with your smartphone to how to earn a seat on a corporate board and make socially responsible investments. They gathered Thursday evening to watch a screening of a new documentary on the history of women at HBS, “A Woman’s Place.” And they reconnected with, as one speaker — former Time Inc. chief Ann Moore, M.B.A.’78 — called it, “the sisterhood of the traveling pantsuit.”The anniversary has become a focal point for the School’s efforts over the past few years to address its gender disparities head-on. Women now make up 40 percent of the M.B.A. program, a figure that would have been unthinkable to the eight women who joined the program in 1963.Three years ago, the School realized its female and international students were underperforming relative to their American male peers. As a result of a campuswide effort, HBS has closed that grade gap, a feat that drew applause in Burden Auditorium on Friday. Still, HBS Dean Nitin Nohria said, “There is so much more work to do,” especially in changing the culture of the School and the broader world.The W50 Summit in particular was a way to reach out to the women who “have sometimes felt disenfranchised, disconnected, unwelcome at Harvard Business School,” Nohria told an audience of graduates that spanned generations. “If there is one thing that I hope this event will do, it is change the relationship that each of you has with this remarkable institution. We need you to be a part of this institution with all your heart.”Dean Nitin Nohria, in addressing head-on the School’s gender disparities: “There is so much more work to do.”Survey on work-life balanceThe occasion also has been “an opportunity for us to accelerate … the advancement of women leaders who make a difference in the world,” Nohria said. Indeed, the anniversary has spawned a survey of several thousand alumnae on work-life balance and a new case study on the female experience at HBS, both of which were presented at the summit.But as Harvard President Drew Faust herself noted at the start of the conference, women are still underrepresented at the top levels of government and business, both in the United States and abroad. Only 4 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs are women; women make up 12 percent of corporate boards in America. Women account 20 percent of the makeup of parliaments worldwide, a figure that holds steady in the U.S. Senate as well. They hold just 26 percent of full professorships across the country — and fewer at HBS, where 22 percent of the faculty are women — and run less than 10 percent of America’s venture-capital-funded startups.Given those numbers, both men and women must do more to “reshape these assumptions and attitudes” that keep women out of leadership roles, Faust said.“Do women need to do more leaning in, or do they need to be confronted with less pushing back?” Faust said to cheers. “I believe the answer is both.”“Keep your hand up”In the past year, no one person has personified that debate so wholly (or with so much controversy) as Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook, whose recently released book “Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead” — equal parts memoir, self-help guide, and working woman’s manifesto — has become a runaway bestseller.In her keynote address on Friday, Sandberg, ’91, M.B.A. ’95, asked the onlookers how many had ever said aloud that they wanted to be CEO of the company they worked for. A few dozen women stood.“You are Harvard Business School graduates,” Sandberg gently chided. “Why do you not automatically stand up?”Sheryl Sandberg poses with Sharon Baum, M.B.A. ’65, a member of the first class of admitted women.Too many women, she said, limit their own aspirations because they think they lack what it takes to lead, because they think blind ambition is distasteful, or because they fear they’re shortchanging their children for the sake of career advancement. But that attitude can be self-defeating, leading women to hold themselves back from promotions or drop out of the workforce altogether.“The No. 1 person who controls whether you keep your hand up is you,” she said, urging the importance of “leaning in” to new career challenges. “The world is not going to notice when you take it down.”Studies have shown that men are more likely to ascribe their successes to their own skills, Sandberg said, while women more often cite factors such as hard work, help from others, or luck. That gap in self-confidence starts as young as middle school, she added, but can be reversed as more and more trailblazing women pave the way — women like Sharon Baum, M.B.A. ’65, whom Sandberg singled out in the audience as one of the original eight women admitted to the School in 1963.“The more women lead, the less we will call little girls bossy,” Sandberg said. “We have the responsibility to do this for ourselves and to teach the women around us to do this.”Media myth vs. realityAs a new HBS survey shows, however, the idea that highly educated women are “opting out” is more media myth than a reality, at least among the School’s own graduates.“Life and Leadership After HBS,” released on Thursday and discussed in a session with Professor Robin Ely, took the pulse of more than 6,000 HBS alumni to gauge and contrast men and women’s attitudes and experiences regarding career and family.Among its more surprising findings was that less than a tenth of Generation X women (ages 31-47) and Baby Boomer women (ages 48-66) were not working at all in order to care for children.“That number is considerably lower than just about anyone I’ve asked has imagined,” said Ely, Diane Doerge Wilson Professor of Business Administration and senior associate dean for culture and community at HBS. “And it’s certainly far lower than the media would lead us to believe.”Over time, the media conversation about work-life balance has shifted slightly, Ely said, from discussing women’s individual choices to showing “a whole set of experiences that look less like women opting out and more like women being pushed out by organizations that demand a 24/7 work schedule, as well as women being pulled out by a culture that promulgates a compelling — some might say guilt-inducing — image of motherhood that’s hard to live up to while you’re trying to hold a job.”Over time, the media conversation about work-life balance has shifted slightly, said Robin Ely, senior associate dean for culture and community at HBS, from discussing women’s individual choices to showing “a whole set of experiences that look less like women opting out and more like women being pushed out by organizations that demand a 24/7 work schedule.” Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerCultures inhospitable to mothersAfter walking the audience through the results, Ely concluded that men and women alike “seem to prioritize family over work. It’s that all these other factors are also at play for women” that lead them to cut back their hours in a way that men often don’t — factors such as exclusion from informal networks in the workplace, a lack of mentors or a supportive work environment, and organizational cultures that are inhospitable to mothers.“What gives us leverage is asking the question, ‘What needs to change in our organizations that will enable us, women and men, to honor all the things we find meaningful in our lives?’” Ely said. “The problem isn’t women’s priorities. It’s work.”The survey’s results on work/life balance — and the difficulty of achieving an egalitarian partnership with a male spouse — didn’t surprise Anne Ristau, M.B.A. ’05, who said she and her husband have taken turns over the years, making sure each of them gets a chance to prioritize career opportunities.“We’ve always been in that three-legged race,” said Ristau, a pregnant, working mother of two. She recently dropped down to part-time at EMC Corporation, where she works as director of channel operations and strategy, but expects to return to full-time work at some point after her third child is born.Since graduating from HBS, “I’ve seen much more bias, whether it’s explicit or implicit, that I didn’t feel here,” Ristau said. “I think it’s impressive what the School has done so quickly, but there’s still the issue of the greater world at large and how they can impact that.”Sheryl Sandberg (MBA 1995) speaks at the HBS W50 Summit <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6xZRaITLgk” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/d6xZRaITLgk/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a>last_img read more

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A museum guide who hopes the group — and the art — talk back

first_imgKeto has served as director of the Harvard Student Art Show and as a tutor for children through the Mission Hill Afterschool Program and the Phillips Brooks House Association. Her involvement, she says, is a way to remind herself “how important it is to engage people of all backgrounds and any level of experience.”While she hasn’t completely settled on a focus for her postgraduate studies, Keto gravitates toward contemporary art. She likes the idea of “writing the first draft” of art history, ensuring that new scholarship reflects the diversity of today’s world.She’s been inspired in this effort by Sarah Lewis, assistant professor in the Departments of History of Art and Architecture (HAA) and African and African American Studies. “Professor Lewis has led me to think about how works of art can help expand the boundaries of citizenship,” said Keto, who is currently taking Lewis’s Picturing America seminar.Lewis, a former Marshall Scholar herself, said she is thrilled to see Keto embark on such a journey. “Elizabeth is attuned to the power of curatorial practice for the creation of public narratives — statements that we make through exhibitions about who counts and who belongs; and not only in the discourse in the field of art history, but in civil society,” Lewis said.Keto’s senior thesis focused on the work of Hanne Darboven (1941–2009), an understudied German artist who lived in New York and was friends with Sol LeWitt and other well-known conceptualists. Keto worked to place Darboven in the context of conceptual art, and analyzed how her art challenges the usual understanding of the genre. Keto’s research involved a visit to Darboven’s home in Hamburg, Germany, funded by an Abramson Traveling Fellowship from HAA.Her final thesis is “one of the most comprehensive theoretical approaches to Darboven I have ever read,” said Benjamin Buchloh, the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Modern Art and Keto’s thesis adviser. “I hope she publishes it soon because the literature on Darboven is very scarce. It would be a major contribution.”Over the summer, Keto will work as an intern in the photography department at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Then it’s off to the Courtauld — a destination that’s “been a dream for a long time,” she said.Even the Marshall Scholarship has fit Keto’s aspirations. “The Marshall is about cooperation, diplomacy, building trust across borders,” she said, “and that’s something I think museums can also be a part of, promoting cultural diplomacy and building understanding.” This is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.Poised and articulate, Elizabeth Keto makes an impression. And she’s been doing that for two years in her role as a student guide at the Harvard Art Museums.Her self-designed gallery tour — featuring such seemingly disparate objects as an Assyrian wall relief, a British “abolitionist” milk jug, and photographs by contemporary American artist LaToya Ruby Frazier — is intended to prompt reflection and conversations, even difficult ones.“My tour asks how art has been used to support or reinforce power, what kinds of politics can have a form in art, and the efficacy of art in producing change,” said Keto, who graduates in May with a concentration in the history of art and architecture. “It’s a tour that resonates with me, and I hope it opens up others’ experiences in the museums.”The recipient of a 2018 Marshall Scholarship, Keto will pursue master’s degrees in art history and curatorial studies at the Courtauld Institute of Art in London. She hopes to someday be a curator focused on making museums more representative of diverse artists and more welcoming to visitors of all backgrounds.“Our country is in the middle of this crucial moment around issues of inclusion and diversity,” said Keto one morning amid the bustle of the museums’ courtyard. “I want to help museums reinforce those values, so that any visitor can see some aspect of her life represented.”Keto said she’s noticed that many people aren’t fully at ease in front of art — even when they’re taking a tour.“People can be intimidated by the museum space, and it can be tough sometimes to get them talking,” Keto said. “But everyone has something interesting or insightful to say; people just need the confidence to speak up.”Growing up in Washington, D.C., Keto visited cultural institutions frequently and found her confidence there and on forays into drawing and painting.Early in high school, she participated in a National Gallery of Art program designed to introduce students to careers in art and museums. “We talked to everyone from curators to the conservators who make frames,” Keto said. “At the end of it, I realized you can do this as a career.”Some of Keto’s passion may run in the family. Her paternal grandmother — her namesake, who died just months before Elizabeth was born — painted and trained as an art historian, and as a retiree guided tours at the National Gallery. “I grew up with the sense that [art] had mattered deeply to someone in my family, and it was always something my parents were open to,” Keto said. “It’s almost like I’ve found out more about [my grandmother] through studying art history. I’ll tell my dad about something I’m studying and he’ll say, ‘I remember my mom talking about that.’”The Class of 2018 experienced the transformed Harvard Art Museums for all their four years on campus; the museums reopened in November 2014 following a major renovation and expansion. Access to art has been critical to Keto’s undergraduate experience; she’s been in the museums at least once a week since she arrived as a freshman.The people Keto meets on her tours serve as both inspiration and sources of knowledge. On one early tour, she spoke to groups about American artist Robert Smullyan Sloan’s painting “Negro Soldier” (1945). A visitor identified himself as a veteran, and then explained the symbolism of the soldier’s ribbons in the painting. “You never know what people are bringing with them,” Keto said. “I always end each tour excited to be able to tell even more to the next group.”That’s no surprise to David Odo, the museums’ director of student programs. “Elizabeth has from the beginning of her involvement with the museums been one of the most intellectually engaged, creative, reliable, and hard-working students I have ever known,” he said. “The museums have been an integral part of my education … a space of learning, discovery, and inspiration.” — Elizabeth Keto ’18last_img read more

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SAO offers free events

first_imgNotre Dame students like to have fun. Tonight, they get the chance to prove it – for free. An evening of campus-wide frivolity and entertainment, Irishenanigans will take place beginning at 8 p.m. The Student Activities Office (SAO) organized the event, coordinating a variety of unusual entertainment opportunities to encourage students to explore campus and interact with peers. David Mattingly, program associate for SAO, said a wide range of events is to take place on campus, mostly between LaFortune Student Center and Stepan Center. All of the activities are free to students. “We have a comedy troupe coming from New York to perform at Washington Hall at 9 p.m., and Stepan Center will have an event [inspired by NBC’s] American Gladiators, complete with Nerf guns and inflatable obstacles,” Mattingly said. “Expect glow-in-the-dark laser tag at Stepan too, with a fire-juggling show at 10:30 p.m.” Free food is also part of the festivities. Mattingly said a cupcake truck parked near North Quad will hand out 1,200 gourmet cupcakes, with a smoothie distribution stationed nearby. A trivia game in The Huddle at midnight will offer “quarter dogs” as prizes, and elephant ears will be available near Stepan Center. Mattingly hopes the events will draw out both new and returning students to get better acquainted with campus and each other. “We want students to go to Washington Hall, and then to Stepan and then LaFortune,” Mattingly said. “We want them to understand that campus is fun, and that it’s exciting to be coming back here for the year.” In planning the event, Mattingly said SAO tried to orchestrate something that would appeal to everyone, so his office organized a vast array events and activities. Students looking for a workout can try their hands at Blitz Ball and Laser Tag in Stepan Center, or at the hourly games of Capture the Flag on the RecSports fields. Students seeking a more relaxing time can listen to live music played by the pop/rock band South Jordan, or catch a game of glow-in-the-dark corn hole. Mattingly said he hoped the variety of activities will draw a variety of students who might not typically interact. “The event is really just a social tool, a way to meet people,” Mattingly said. “You can do the cool exciting stuff or the more relaxing activities. There’s something for everyone.last_img read more

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Forestry’s Economic Impact

first_imgTrees are a big business in the South. With more than 209 million acres of timberland spread across the 13-state region and landowners planting more trees every year, the forest products industry supports about 1.2 million jobs.This spring, the Southern Regional Extension Forestry office (SREF), in partnership with the Southern Group of State Foresters (SGSF), launched a one-stop website offering the most recent data on the economic impacts of forestry and timberland across the South.The website, forestryimpacts.net, provides easy access to economic impact reports for each of the 13 states in the Southern region, as well as links to other relevant forest economic resources on the web. SREF and its partners created the website to respond to the needs of educators, policymakers, community leaders and the general public for comprehensive and convenient forest-related economic information. It serves as an essential resource for those seeking to promote the importance of forestry and the forest products industry.“The website is the result of a tremendous amount of work by those within the state forestry and university system in the Southern region,” said William G. Hubbard, Southern Regional Extension Forester at SREF. “SREF Extension associates Steven Weaver and Leslie Boby are to be commended for shepherding such a powerful resource into existence.”Other partners on the effort include the Association of Southern Rural Extension Directors (ASRED) and the state and private forestry unit of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service’s (USFS) Southern Region.About Southern Regional Extension ForestrySREF serves Southern land-grant universities and forestry professionals through collaborative development of forestry technologies and programs that improve the efficiency, effectiveness and relevance of supporting institutions. For more information about SREF, visit sref.info.last_img read more

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Norwegian wealth fund continues long-term push for sustainable investments

first_imgNorwegian wealth fund continues long-term push for sustainable investments FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Financial Times ($):It is not perhaps the most obvious idea for an investor that derives all its inflows from oil and gas revenues to prioritise sustainability. But Norway’s $1tn oil fund has been different from the beginning. One of the few sovereign wealth funds in a democracy, the Norwegian fund has put ethical issues at the heart of what it does.“We are a fund for future generations,” says Carine Smith Ihenacho, chief corporate governance officer at Norges Bank Investment Management, which manages the fund for the Norwegian people. “Sustainability in investments is essential for long-term value creation and also safeguarding the value we have,” she adds.Because of the fund’s size — on average it owns 1.4 per cent of every listed company globally and 2.4 per cent of each European business on the stock market — its pronouncements are followed closely by many investors, with a smaller subset aping its actions.The fund has not been able to shy away from controversy or charges of hypocrisy. Some of the most charged debates have revolved around what the fund should do with investments in fossil fuels. After years of political debate, Norway’s parliament decided in 2015 to force the fund to sell out of any mining company or power producer that derived more than 30 per cent of its revenues or operations from coal.The biggest problem has been finding proper information as many companies do not disclose the share of coal in their revenue or energy production mix. The fund has been forced to try to find out much of the information itself. “The work is in many ways ongoing,” says Ms. Ihenacho, with the fund having barred more than 70 companies from its portfolio. Nonetheless, many environmentalists are annoyed with how the fund interprets the criteria, with several pressure groups recently urging it to sell out of German utility RWE, which runs several coal-fired power plants.To help it secure more information on climate risk and other topics, the fund has developed its own proprietary tool, called Angle. This gives portfolio managers not just information on financial and governance issues but also non-financial measures, such as carbon emissions. Ms. Ihenacho says the fund, with other investors, is pushing companies for better disclosure of such non-financial measures as well as greater standardisation to enable shareholders to compare businesses more easily.More ($): Sustainable investment key to Norway sovereign wealth oil fund strategylast_img read more

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Lawmakers discuss diversity issues with FI regulators

first_imgThe House Financial Services Subcommittee on Diversity and Inclusion Tuesday held a hearing with representatives from various financial institution regulators, including the NCUA, and explored ways to ensure the financial services industry is representative of the U.S. population.NCUA Office of Minority and Women Inclusion (OMWI) Director Monica Davy in her written testimony for the hearing touted the industry’s “vital role in providing safe and affordable financial services in our nation’s underserved communities.” She also highlighted the NCUA’s efforts to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) within the credit union industry and how the agency is working to diversify its workforce.The OMWI in April released its annual report that highlighted key findings from credit unions’ diversity assessments and the NCUA’s DEI efforts.During Tuesday’s hearing, Subcommittee Chairwoman Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio, asked Davy about credit unions’ diversity assessments and if they should be mandatory. Currently, the Credit Union Diversity Self-Assessment is voluntary, and Davy indicated the agency is satisfied with that. NCUA Chairman Rodney Hood last month encouraged credit unions to complete the assessment to help the industry make more of an impact on societal justice. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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WWF Adria: The fundamental role of protected areas is nature protection, not tourism

first_imgNEW TOURIST PACKAGE FOCUSED ON ECO-TOURISM TESTED IN NP KORNATI This meeting was organized by the World Conservation Organization WWF at the initiative of Croatian protected areas who liked the results of the DestiMED project, which helped WWF design two eco-tourism offers in the Kornati National Park and the Lastovo Islands Nature Park.”The impression we can often get from the media when talking about national parks and nature parks is that the success of a protected area is measured by the number of visits, and this can by no means be a true indicator. Namely, tourism is often the biggest threat to the preservation of these most beautiful and biologically most important areas of our country.”, Points out Mosor Prvan, DestiMED project manager at WWF Adria.Tourism can be an opportunity to protect nature, but also to create a sustainable local economy, which increases the quality of life and business of the local population. “Through the DestiMED project, we have managed to create two success stories about the coexistence of nature protection and tourism – where revenues remain with the local community, tourists contribute to nature protection, and the negative impact of tourism on nature is far within sustainability. Now we want to replicate these two stories, Lastovo and Kornati, in other Croatian parks. “, points out Prvan, adding that building cooperation and trust between the local population and public institutions that manage the parks is crucial. The fundamental role of protected areas is nature protection, not tourism – agreed representatives of the nature protection sector who gathered in Zagreb for a two-day workshop “Creating an eco-tourism offer in protected areas – opportunities and threats to conservation goals.” The ecotourism packages developed in NP Kornati and PP Lastovo are entering the commercial phase this summer and, together with other protected areas in the Mediterranean that are part of the DestiMED project, will be sold to agencies dealing with sustainable tourism. The workshop brought together representatives of about twenty Croatian protected areas, as well as representatives of the Ministry of Environmental Protection and Energy, the Ministry of Tourism and the Institute of Tourism, but also the business sector (Intrepid Travel – PEAK, Šibenik Plus). Through the presentation of the results of the DestiMED project, both by WWF and the project partners of IUCN and NP Kornati, the participants were given the idea of ​​how to develop an eco-tourism package. In this, they were additionally assisted by employees in the tourism sector who, with their knowledge and experience, pointed out possible challenges.center_img AFTER KORNAT AND LASTOV, AND OTHER PROTECTED AREAS INTERESTED IN ECO-TOURISM RELATED NEWS: Cover photo: NP Krkalast_img read more