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Everton’s Marco Silva accuses Anthony Martial of diving for penalty

first_imgEverton Anthony Martial dazzles to help Manchester United edge past Everton Share on Pinterest Idrissa Gueye appeared to touch the ball before Martial made contact with his leg. Everton’s manager said: “It was not a penalty – it is clear the player dived, it leaves a bad sensation. I told the players at half-time it was not a fair result. When the game is balanced in the first 20-25 minutes, the penalty starts to put them ahead in the match and more comfortable.“That moment, it was no penalty. It was difficult for us. That moment makes it easy for our opponents. You are more exposed then because you have to take more risks. They scored a fantastic goal but we had a good chance to score at 2-1.”Gylfi Sigurdsson scored Everton’s goal from the spot after Richarlison was felled by Chris Smalling. “Our one was a clear penalty, not like the first one,” Silva said. “The referee is there in that moment and it looks like my player touched the ball. I don’t think it is a tough decision. I don’t want to talk about it more because I respect the referee. One thing is clear is that without that moment, it would have been more tough for them. When you play against Manchester United, and in their stadium, they create chances. The referee made things easier for them, but we have to shoot better in some situations.” news José Mourinho said: “I think the referee was very good in all the game. He was solid and consistent. In the two penalty actions he was consistent.” Topics Share via Email Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIncenter_img Share on Facebook Read more Marco Silva accused Anthony Martial of diving for Manchester United’s 27th-minute penalty in their 2-1 victory over Everton. Paul Pogba scored on the rebound following Jordan Pickford’s save. Manchester United Share on WhatsApp Share on Messenger The Fiver: sign up and get our daily football email. Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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10 months agoSporting CP target Liverpool winger Rafa Camacho

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Sporting CP target Liverpool winger Rafa Camachoby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool are expected to release Rafa Camacho for loan next month.The Liverpool Echo says Sporting CP want their ex-academy star for the rest of the season, with a number of Championship clubs also interested.Camacho, 18, can play across the front line and was also used as a full-back in an impressive pre-season campaign under Jurgen Klopp.After starring in America, his performances in the Uefa Youth League have brought him plenty of suitors.The Portugal Under-20s international is yet to make his first-team debut but could be contention next season if he can gain experience on a short-term deal elsewhere. last_img

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19 days agoBarcelona coach Valverde admits Dembele dismissal baffled him

first_imgBarcelona coach Valverde admits Dembele dismissal baffled himby Carlos Volcano19 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona coach Ernesto Valverde admits Ousmane Dembele’s dismissal against Sevilla baffled him.Dembele was sent off late in Barcelona’s win for comments made to the referee just moments after Ronald Araujo was shown a straight red himself.It has been reported that the Frenchman said “very bad, you’re very bad” to the referee, which saw him given his marching orders.”I don’t know what he said,” Valverde said when asked for his opinion in his post-match press conference.”But I don’t think it was too long a sentence.”With the Araujo dismissal on his debut, it didn’t seem like a foul to me.”Then the Dembele one is a mystery.”Looking at the match as a whole, Valverde was understandably delighted to finish with such a comprehensive scoreline.”It was a complicated and important game for us,” he explained.”They’ve had a lot of chances, but this is what it is.”They left spaces and we had more punch, which proved key.” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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5 days agoLeicester keeper Schmeichel says being late bloomer is career motivation

first_imgLeicester keeper Schmeichel says being late bloomer is career motivationby Paul Vegas5 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLeicester City goalkeeper Kasper Schmeichel says being a late bloomer has helped his career motivation.The Dane made his international debut at 26, though is now regarded among the best keepers in the world. He reached a personal national team landmark last week against Switzerland. Schmeichel made super four saves in the 1-0 European Championships qualifying win.And the Foxes favourite admits his late career recognition is now working in his favour. At 32 years of age, Schmeichel insists he’s as ambitious and motivated as ever.Now boasting 50 caps, he was quoted by Bold as saying, “It was a big motivating factor that I was not involved in the national team earlier in my career, but I am grateful to be part of it now and it makes me proud to play 50 games for my country – now I just hope for 50 more.”If I don’t last five years, then I will be disappointed.”Indeed, while not taking anything for granted, Schmeichel is adamant that thoughts of retirement are far into the future. The goalkeeper, who is in his eighth year with Leicester, is determined to make the most of a period in his career where he is now reaching his peak. After spells with the likes of Darlington and Bury, Schmeichel is grateful for his current status in the game.He added: “You can’t plan in football. Anything can happen. You can get hurt tomorrow and not have the opportunity to come back, so you have to be grateful every time you are teamed up with the national team.”Every match I get in the Parken in front of such an audience, I am incredibly grateful for, because it happens so rarely. We must be proud of all the matches we can fight for the national team.”- updated 21/10 About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Oklahoma’s Jamal Danley Shares 1-Year-Old Facebook Post From Fan Telling Him Not To Play For Sooners

first_imgJamal Danley's Facebook post 1 year later.jamal danley facebook postIn 2014, Oklahoma posted an 8-5 record, finished fourth in the Big 12, and got blasted by Clemson in the Russell Athletic Bowl, 40-6. In the offseason, the Sooners made a number of coaching changes – especially on the offensive side of the ball – in an attempt to reestablish dominance in the conference. A year later, they’re 11-1 and a lock to make the College Football Playoff.Tuesday, junior offensive lineman Jamal Danley, who was a four-star JUCO transfer this year, posted a Facebook message that was written to him while he was making his decision on where to play in 2015. The post, which looks to have been sent by a fan, focuses on Oklahoma’s demise and calls Danley “SEC material.” Danley clearly finds it amusing, seeing where OU is right now.1 year later! pic.twitter.com/Z9HiJrX8NG— Jamal Danley™ (@JDanley54) November 30, 2015Oklahoma has off this week as it prepares for to play for a national championship. Apparently, not everyone saw that coming a year ago.last_img read more

Canal has secured the rights to English Premier L

first_imgCanal+ has secured the rights to English Premier League football in France for three seasons from next year and has renewed its existing contract for the Premier League in Poland.Winning back the Premier League, currently held by Altice’s RMC Sport, is a significant coup for the embattled pay TV broadcaster, which saw its grip on France’s top tier Ligue 1 rights removed by Spanish broadcaster Mediapro earlier this year when it outbid the pay TV operator to secure these from 2020. Canal+ also lost the UEFA Champions League and Europa League rights from this year to Altice.Canal+ said that winning back the rights “reflects the Group’s drive to invest in premium content over time and to offer an unparalleled football offering, primarily on its own channels”.The acquisition of Premier League rights means that in France, Canal+ will be able to offer a selction of French football games including the top three Ligue 1 games, the Premier league and Top14 French rugby, Formula 1, Moto GP, WRC, Golf and the 2020 Olympics.In Poland, the Premier League will join Polish national league Lotto Ekstraklasa, 50% of Spanish La Liga, selected German Bundesliga matches, NBA, the best speedway league in the world PGE Ekstraliga and Speedway Grand Prix, CEV Volleyball Champions League, EHF Champions League, Polish handball Superliga, Rugby Six Nations Cup, and PGA golfThe reversion of French Premier League rights to Canal+ is a blow for Altice and RMC Sport. SFR said it would work with Canal+, in “the spirit of” an existing agreement giving Canal+ access to Champions League, to provide RMC Sport subscribers access to the Premier League from next year. The operator was referring to an offer launched in September providing Canal+, BeIN Sports and RMC Sport to its subscribers for €40 a month.SFR said that RMC Sport remained “the most complete sports platform” but said that, in terms of exclusive rights, it would now focus on “premium events” like the Champions League.last_img read more

New book encompasses the vast history of reproduction

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 7 2018A new book is the first to encompass the vast history of how living things procreate, from the banks of the ancient Nile to the fertility clinics of today.The first book to take in 3,000 years of baby-making shows how women functioned as “vessels” in early ideas of creation, until the ancient Greeks established theories of “dual contribution” – whether two seeds or two souls – that dominated beliefs about how everything multiplied for centuries to come.This notion of “generation”, when two individuals combine to produce new life, was understood as an “active making of humans, beasts, plants and even minerals”. Likened to artisanal processes such as baking and brewing, say researchers, it shaped cultural and religious doctrine right up to the 19th century.From the 1740s, new science promoted a fresh concept: reproduction. The book’s authors show how this more abstract view gave us the sperm and egg, “test-tube” conception outside bodies, and all the language and ethical dilemmas we live with today – from population anxieties to surrogate mothers.Published by Cambridge University Press, Reproduction: Antiquity to the Present Day is the first major synthesis of decades of scholarship comprising millennia of human attempts to make (and not make) more of ourselves, other animals and plants.Led by three University of Cambridge academics, and pooling the expertise of historians from across Cambridge and around the world, the book is the culmination of a five-year project funded by the Wellcome Trust.”When we talk about major issues facing global society today, from climate change and migration to childcare and medical ethics, then to a large extent we are talking about reproduction: how it happens and how it should,” says Professor Nick Hopwood, from Cambridge’s Department of History and Philosophy of Science.”Reproduction has always been important, but in different ways. To provide a long-term perspective, we wanted to look deep into the history of reproductive practices and beliefs.”Hopwood co-edited the book with Cambridge colleagues Professor Lauren Kassell and Dr Rebecca Flemming. Over its 44 chapters and 40 ‘exhibits’, the lavishly illustrated volume features contributions from nearly 70 leading researchers.Flemming, from Cambridge’s Faculty of Classics, directs the first section, which takes the reader from antiquity to the early middle ages, and tells the story of the “invention of generation”.”The framework of ‘generation’ produced in classical Greece gave important, if unequal, roles to both women and men. This contrasted with the exclusive emphasis on masculine potency creating life and the cosmos that dominated Egypt and the ancient Near East,” says Flemming.Women and procreation became an integral part of the thriving Greek medicine – the “Hippocratic gynaecology” – of the fifth and fourth centuries BC. Female “seed” and blood provided vital contributions, and the child “grew like rising bread dough” in the womb. Cures for infertility and instructions for safe birthing were prominent.Philosophers including Aristotle grappled with “coming to be” in all its manifestations, along with the ideal population size for a state and how to achieve it, while farmers applied burgeoning livestock techniques.As different areas of the Mediterranean world converged, so too did ideas of generation. Greece gave way to Rome, and, according to Flemming, “the imperial metropolis of the second century AD was where the physician Galen put seeds, womb and menstrual blood into their most influential arrangement”. This would hold through the religious and political changes of the next centuries.Societies were still highly patriarchal, however. Romans mapped male physiology onto female bodies, says Flemming: ovaries were women’s testicles, the uterus was a deflated scrotum and a weak female ‘sperma’ was designed to lock in male seed. “Women were viewed as inferior versions of men due to their apparent ‘mutilations’ for accommodating babies.”Lauren Kassell of Cambridge’s Department of History and Philosophy of Science oversees the medieval and early modern periods, when theories of ‘generation’ expanded. Scientific inquiry was applied to distant lands and microscopic structures, and women and artisans joined in debates.Related StoriesAssisted reproductive technology solution from Olympus increases the efficiency of ICSITrump administration cracks down on fetal tissue researchBlastocyst transfer linked to higher risk of preterm birth, large-for-gestational-age rates”Numerous Greek works were translated into Arabic from the eighth century. Scholars from Asia and Egypt reworked theories about the importance of the female seed and the formation of the fetus – challenging older authorities,” says Kassell.Following the devastation of the Black Death, Christian clergy were instructed to counsel parishioners about sex to encourage “fruitful marriages”. Influenced by sex-positive attitudes from Arabic texts, church law supported spousal obligations to “honour each other’s desire for sexual gratification”.Lineage, paramount to social order, was threatened by women having children outside marriage, although men were free to do so – with theories of family resemblance invoked in cases of disputed paternity. While unwed women feared pregnancy, Kassell says that moral and medical advisors continued to be more interested in promoting rather than limiting fertility.”Questions about pregnancy defined early modern medical encounters. Seventeenth-century medical casebooks reveal diagnostic approaches for female fertility that are superficially familiar to modern readers, such as observing changes to a woman’s body and examining her urine, as well as the more otherworldly interpretations of the positions of the stars.”Within households, fertility was the business of men as well as women. Some husbands charted their wives’ menstruation cycles. The book features diary sections written by the mathematician and occult philosopher John Dee, in which he recorded his wife Jane’s periods alongside notes about meetings with Elizabeth I.Hopwood guides readers into the era of ‘reproduction’: a long revolution not just in society and culture, thought and technology, but also in terminology. The word is older, but its modern use began in earnest in the 1740s, when experiments to regenerate tiny freshwater animals after cutting or sieving provided a model for reproduction in general.It was not until the 1870s, however, that a scientific consensus emerged on the roles of eggs and sperm in fertilization. (In 1827, the same year he discovered the mammalian egg, embryologist Karl Ernst von Baer named ‘spermatozoa’ but dismissed them as parasites.)”As European birth-rates fell, reproduction became linked to worries about the quality as well as the quantity of populations, including nationalist fantasies of racial vigour,” says Hopwood. These would result in some of humanity’s darkest hours.People in industrialized countries increasingly limited the size of their families in the early 20th century, while governments initially fought contraception and abortion. Some worried that state control of reproduction would lead doctors to create humans “as farmers breed their beasts”. Others were more concerned that maternal mortality stayed stubbornly high.As reproduction moved centre stage after World War II, science and medicine took ever more important roles in childbirth (now safer), contraception (now respectable), and attempts to alleviate infertility. Feminist activists campaigned against “battery births” and for “a woman’s right to choose”. Environmentalists promoted population control.Hopwood contributes a chapter on the strange history of artificial fertilization, taking in horse-semen thieves,test-tube sea urchins, experiments to produce human-orangutan hybrids, and fertility magnates promising Nobel Laureate sperm. More routinely, over five million IVF babies have now been born around the world, though assisted conception is provided through the market more than by states.The book closes with contemporary phenomena, from egg freezing and “repro-travel” to food security and infant mortality, and the media debates that shape attitudes towards them. “Today, reproduction happens on screens as well as in bedrooms, clinics and barns,” says Hopwood.The editors hope the book’s extraordinary chronological range will give readers new insights into the past and prompt reflection on current challenges. “Long views reveal continuities we miss by focusing on a mere century or two, but the very similarities direct attention to the specifics of change,” Hopwood adds.​Source: https://www.cam.ac.uk/reproductionlast_img read more

Exposure to antenatal corticosteroid therapy associated with reduced fetal growth

first_imgRelated StoriesPersonalizing Nutritional Medicine With the Power of NMRAntibiotic combination effective against drug-resistant PseudomonasNew strategy may strengthen gut-brain communicationGuidelines currently recommend one dose, repeated over 24 hours, of ACT to accelerate lung maturation in cases of threatened preterm birth. However, many exposed infants end up born at term and are therefore exposed unnecessarily to any potential harms of ACT. In the new study, researchers studied all live-born singleton births in Finland from 2006 through 2010. De-identified data were available on ACT exposure, birth weight, birth length, head circumference, Apgar scores, and medical care of infants.4,887 women (1.75%) were treated with ACT and, of those exposed, more than 44% (2173) of infants were born at term. Adjusted analyses showed significant differences in birth weight between exposed and unexposed infants, with an apparent reduction in birth weight of 61.54 grams for very preterm babies exposed to ACT (±SE 28.62, P<.03), 222.78 grams for preterm babies (±SE 19.64, P<.001), 159.25 grams for near term babies (±SE 19.14, P<.001), and 91.62 grams for term babies (±SE 11.86, P<.03). Associations were also seen for birth length and head circumference. There were no significant differences in Apgar scores, but ACT-exposed infants generally required greater medical care during the first seven days of life and beyond.“These findings provide strong evidence indicating that ACT is associated with reduced fetal growth in humans and provide an agenda for further studies,” the authors say. “Early care decisions need to identify high-risk patients and weigh benefits of ACT against potential harm of unnecessary exposure.” Credit: Fotorech, Pixabay Feb 28 2019Infants exposed to antenatal corticosteroid therapy (ACT) to accelerate lung maturation have a clinically significant reduction in birth size, according to a new of study of 278,508 births published this week in PLOS Medicine by Alina Rodriguez of the University of Lincoln and Imperial College London, UK, and colleagues.center_img Source:https://www.plos.orglast_img read more

Lenovo posts 189 mn fullyear loss on onetime writeoff

first_imgChinese technology giant Lenovo on Thursday said it recorded a $189 million net loss for its full fiscal year due mainly to a one-time charge, while saying it was planning an overhaul to broaden its appeal. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The Beijing-based company also reported a 69 percent decline in profit in its fourth quarter ending March 31. Quarterly profit was $33 million, compared to $107 million in the same quarter last year.Revenue in the fourth quarter increased 11 percent year-on-year to 10.6 billion, the first double-digit increase in 10 quarters, while full-year revenue was up five percent, it said in a statement to the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.Full-year profit was hit by a $400 million non-cash write-off charge from deferred income tax assets, the company said.Lenovo continues to be weighted down by the poor performance of a subscale mobile segment despite an improved datacenter business, Johnathan Ritucci, a Bloomberg Intelligence analyst, wrote ahead of the release. “Its US PC franchise strategy also needs to be confronted quickly, as (rival Hewlett-Packard) continues to gain segment share,” he said.The company’s shares rose more than four percent after the results were released, but later gave up most of those gains in the afternoon to sit 1.6 percent higher.However, the stock will be kicked out of Hong Kong’s benchmark index next month, after plunging around 70 percent over the past three years.Lenovo said it will combine its personal computer group, smart devices and mobile business into an “intelligent devices group”, transforming itself from a single PC hardware company into multi-business group.The company merged its mobile and PC businesses under Chief Operating Officer Gianfranco Lanci, a Lenovo veteran who helped to build company’s presence in Europe according to Bloomberg News.In 2014, the company bought smartphone maker Motorola from Google and IBM’s low-end server business as part of a strategy to expand its business beyond PCs. Citation: Lenovo posts $189 mn full-year loss on one-time write-off (2018, May 24) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-lenovo-mn-full-year-loss-one-time.html Explore furthercenter_img © 2018 AFP China’s Lenovo posts first revenue fall for six years (Update) Lenovo said it will combine its PC group, smart devices and mobile business into an ‘intelligent devices group’last_img read more

Six more die of Japanese Encephalitis in Assam toll rises to 82

first_img Press Trust of India GuwahatiJuly 15, 2019UPDATED: July 15, 2019 23:20 IST Representative image (PTI)Six more people died of Japanese Encephalitis (JE) in Assam on Monday, taking the toll to 82, a National Health Mission (NHM) bulletin said.The number of JE positive cases in the state increased to 374 with 82 cases being reported on Monday, it said.One death each was reported from Barpeta, Darrang, Hailakandi, Jorhat, Lakhimpur and Tinsukia districts, the NHM bulletin said.The vector-borne disease affects the brain.The six persons who died were undergoing treatment at intensive care units (ICUs) of hospitals in the six districts, it added.ALSO READ | Over 60 malaria cases in Delhi, 27 of dengueALSO WATCH | Supreme Court expresses anguish over rising encephalitis death tollFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAnupriya Thakur Tags :Follow EncephalitisFollow Japanese EncephalitisFollow Assam Six more die of Japanese Encephalitis in Assam, toll rises to 82The number of Japanese Encephalitis positive cases in the state increased to 374 with 82 cases being reported on Monday, it said.advertisement Nextlast_img read more