qsnpgveex

Xiaomi Poco F1 now available in Rosso Red colour in India, will go on sale on October 11

first_imgXiaomi’s sub-brand Poco launched its first phone aka the Poco F1 in August this year. Until now, the Poco F1 was available in Blue and Black colours only. At the launch, Xiaomi did announce a Red version of the phone but the model wasn’t available for purchase. On Thursday, Xiaomi announced the Rosso Red Edition of the Poco F1 and said that it will go on sale in India for the first time on October 11. All the variants of the Poco F1 will be available in Rosso Red colour. The smartphone will be available for buying via Mi.com and other online retailers. Apart from the colour, the specs and the price of the Rosso Red Edition of the Poco F1 are the same as other models.The Poco F1 is available in 6GB RAM/64GB storage, 8GB RAM/ 256GB storage, 6GB RAM/ 128GB storage, and special Armoured Edition 8GB RAM/ 256GB storage with Kevlar back variants. The 6GB RAM/64GB storage version of the Poco F1 comes with a price tag of Rs 20,999. The 8GB RAM/ 256GB storage version is priced at Rs 28,999, 6GB RAM/ 128GB storage comes for Rs 23,999 and lastly the special Armored edition of the Poco F1 with 8GB RAM and 256GB storage comes at Rs 29,999.The Poco F1 sports a massive 6.18-inch FHD+ IPS LCD display with a 1080×2246 pixel resolution and aspect ratio of 18.7:9. Being a mid-range smartphone the Poco F1 comes with Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845 processor which mainly powers flagship phones like the OnePlus 6, Samsung Galaxy Note 9, among others.advertisementThe Poco F1 packs a dual camera setup on the rear panel and a single sensor on the front. On the back, the smartphone comes with a primary camera of 12MP with f/1.9 aperture and a secondary camera of 5MP for depth shots. The dual rear camera setup of the Poco F1 comes with several AI-based camera features like scene recognition, among others. On the front, the Poco F1 sports a 20-megapixel selfie shooter paired with soft LED flash and AI features.ALSO READ: Xiaomi Poco F1 review: New flagship killer in townThe Poco F1 runs Android 8.1 Oreo-based MIUI 9.6 software with a customized Poco launcher out-of-the-box but will be soon upgraded to MIUI 10. The smartphone has already received the MIUI 10 global beta update and will soon get the stable version of the software. The phone includes a massive 4,000mAh battery and supports Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 3.0 and USB Type-C.last_img read more

tfgjtbdph

5 days agoLeicester keeper Schmeichel says being late bloomer is career motivation

first_imgLeicester keeper Schmeichel says being late bloomer is career motivationby Paul Vegas5 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLeicester City goalkeeper Kasper Schmeichel says being a late bloomer has helped his career motivation.The Dane made his international debut at 26, though is now regarded among the best keepers in the world. He reached a personal national team landmark last week against Switzerland. Schmeichel made super four saves in the 1-0 European Championships qualifying win.And the Foxes favourite admits his late career recognition is now working in his favour. At 32 years of age, Schmeichel insists he’s as ambitious and motivated as ever.Now boasting 50 caps, he was quoted by Bold as saying, “It was a big motivating factor that I was not involved in the national team earlier in my career, but I am grateful to be part of it now and it makes me proud to play 50 games for my country – now I just hope for 50 more.”If I don’t last five years, then I will be disappointed.”Indeed, while not taking anything for granted, Schmeichel is adamant that thoughts of retirement are far into the future. The goalkeeper, who is in his eighth year with Leicester, is determined to make the most of a period in his career where he is now reaching his peak. After spells with the likes of Darlington and Bury, Schmeichel is grateful for his current status in the game.He added: “You can’t plan in football. Anything can happen. You can get hurt tomorrow and not have the opportunity to come back, so you have to be grateful every time you are teamed up with the national team.”Every match I get in the Parken in front of such an audience, I am incredibly grateful for, because it happens so rarely. We must be proud of all the matches we can fight for the national team.”- updated 21/10 About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

tviohxebw

Majority of firsttime buyers maxed out budgets to buy a home CMHC

first_imgTORONTO – The country’s real estate market may be taking a breather, but a new survey suggests the vast majority of recent homebuyers are maxing out their budgets to purchase their first homes.In its annual mortgage consumer study, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. found that 85 per cent of first-time buyers reported spending the most they could afford on their property.Despite this, 76 per cent say they were still confident that they would be able to make their monthly mortgage payments.Sixty per cent of first-timers and 69 per cent of repeat buyers reported having “sufficient assets” such as investments or other properties to help them if they were to run into financial trouble with their mortgage.The federal housing agency, which has been conducting the survey since 1999, says housing affordability continues to be the most important factor cited among first-time and repeat homebuyers, when compared to other factors such as a property’s neighbourhood, proximity to work and condition.More than half of those concerned say their top worries included unforeseen costs, paying too much for their home and rising interest rates.The Bank of Canada has raised its key interest rate target four times to 1.5 per cent since July 2017. It is widely anticipated that the central bank will announce another hike at its next meeting on Oct. 24.Some housing markets across the country have already been feeling the cooling effects of higher interest rates coupled with some recently introduced measures like the new mortgage stress test and a 15 per cent foreign buyer tax in Ontario.Earlier this week, the Canadian Real Estate Association reported that national home sales fell for the first time in five months in September amid weakening markets in Vancouver and Toronto.Despite prices also flattening, the outlook on the national real estate market remains positive.The CMHC survey found that 80 per cent of homebuyers polled still believe that buying property is a good long-term financial investment. Sixty-six per cent believed their home value would increase within the next 12 months.The online survey, which was conducted in April, polled more than 4,000 Canadians who became mortgage consumers in the last year.The polling industry’s professional body, the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association, says online surveys cannot be assigned a margin of error as they are not a random sample and therefore are not necessarily representative of the whole population.Follow @LindaNguyenTO on Twitter.last_img read more

nbxpkknjx

Venezuela holds onto prized US refineries amid legal battle

first_imgCARACAS, Venezuela — Venezuela will hold onto its U.S.-based Citgo refineries, settling a lawsuit that threw ownership of the struggling country’s prized assets into peril.Court papers show that Venezuela on Friday began paying off $1.4 billion that a panel said was owed to the Canadian mining firm Crystallex, following a disputed takeover of the company by the late-President Hugo Chavez.To recoup its losses, Crystallex had targeted Citgo refineries, potentially forcing Venezuela to sell off its most valuable foreign asset.Papers filed in a Canadian court say Venezuela recently paid Crystallex $425 million, while agreeing to make good on the rest by 2021. That enables them to hold onto their refineries.Russ Dallen of Miami-based Caracas Capital Markets says the payment shows Venezuela’s changing tactics — from fighting creditors to striking deals.The Associated Presslast_img read more

qsnpgveex

Light rain relieves Delhiites from punishing heat

first_imgNew Delhi: A light bout of rain and windy conditions Friday provided much-needed respite from the scorching dry heat in the national capital, officials said. The weatherman said a number of areas in the city recorded light rainfall accompanied by cool breeze. The city has been witnessing temperatures soaring to mid-40s over the last few days. On Tuesday, Palam recorded a sizzling high of 45.3 degrees Celsius, equalling the record high of April 25, 1970. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss account details under automatic exchange frameworkOn Friday, the city recorded a high of 39.5 degrees Celsius and a low of 24.8 degrees Celsius. The humidity level oscillated between 37 and 64 per cent. The relative humidity recorded at 8.30 am was 54 per cent. The Met office has predicted partly cloudy skies for Saturday. The maximum and minimum temperatures are likely to hover around 40 and 24 degrees Celsius. On Thursday, the minimum temperature was 25.8 degrees Celsius and the maximum temperature settled at 41 degrees Celsius.last_img read more

vfdxlutgq

The WalkOn

How Madden Ratings Are Made The Secret Process That Turns NFL Players Into Digital Gods by Neil Paine graphics by Reuben Fischer-Baum illustration by Mike McQuade Original 75 Comments Hidden Skill Set Poor awareness, decision-making Walt Hickey @WaltHickey Moore’s ratings elicit all sorts of reactions — anger, joy, pride, ridicule. Here, for example, is a sampling of reactions on Twitter to Tom Brady’s ratings over the last few years. madden rating tom brady a 93 further exemplifies why it is the worst of the EA sports games #thatsjustdisrespectful #hesthegreatestever— mackey (@kylemack_) August 28, 2012 Reuben Fischer-Baum is a visual journalist for FiveThirtyEight. “I’ve heard it speculated that even the Madden team themselves don’t really know what’s going on,” Bailey said. In the next madden game Tom Brady’s rating is going to be 100— Zachary Olds (@ZacharyOlds) February 2, 2015 The quarterback drills brought me back to earth. Asked to throw the ball as far as I could, I threw it pretty consistently between 17 and 20 yards in an often-loose spiral. I then threw the ball toward my colleague Neil Paine, who was trying his hand at receiver, and connected only 40 percent of the time on short, medium and long passes. Watching the drills unfold, Moore said I was throwing the ball too low and would probably end up hitting offensive linemen in the back of the head often. When I had exhausted my arm, I did some receiving drills — or attempted to. I was useless beyond 10 yards but caught each of the three short passes thrown my way. Brad Hilderbrand, a communications specialist for EA, said I could possibly be a great tight end. My pride swelled again. And then it withered the moment my foot touched a football. My range was so pathetic that I couldn’t boot it more than 20 yards, which at least doesn’t preclude me from being one of the league’s great onside kickers. Punting was no better. Any team with me as its punter would go for it on fourth down every time because I couldn’t kick it farther than 11 yards. “Offensive guard is probably your athletic skill set,” Moore said at the end of the day. “But you’re probably going to want to put on 100 pounds. So, that’s going to be hard for you to bulk up there and still maintain the performance that you put on display today.” Leaving Orlando, I reflected on the day and felt one thing above all: extreme pain. My back was seizing up, my right arm went somewhat numb, and a nap had only made me more sore. When I got home in the wee-morning hours, I took enough ibuprofen to dull my senses and decided that I should exercise more often.3 The soreness continued for three more days. I strolled onto the gridiron in Orlando wearing old gym clothes and the cheapest sneakers available, which I had ordered three days prior. I did the three stretches I remembered from my middle school Presidential Physical Fitness Test — touch your toes, lunge side to side, twist your arm out of its socket — and some light jogging. That may have tired me out more than I expected. My 40-yard dash and 10-yard split times were poor — 6.75 seconds and 2.30 seconds, respectively. Those numbers were a problem because they determined my speed and acceleration grades, which are two of the most important ratings in Madden. Player performance is notoriously more difficult to quantify in football than in baseball. Physical Talent Throwing Power Moore lobbied for many of the new rating categories, spurred by the same motivation that drove “Micro League Baseball” to add player ratings in the first place: greater differentiation among players. It says so right on his business card. ^ Including practice-squad members, free agents and other fringe players. ^ The namesake of retired coach and commentator John Madden. ^ Their equipment styles, for instance. ^ Good rightly cautioned me about the imprudence of declaring anything in gaming a definitive “first,” given the variety — and, just as often, the obscurity — of games and platforms in the medium’s history. ^ It’s impossible to say because “Micro League” didn’t actually have the capacity to track statistics from simulated games. ^ Perhaps it’s no coincidence that in another region of the baseball universe, the field of sabermetrics was tracing a parallel path at roughly the same time. Both endeavors were seeking to distill a player’s on-field performance to its numerical core, albeit for somewhat different purposes. ^ Acceleration, agility, hands, strength, speed, endurance, intelligence and discipline. ^ Also developed by EA’s Tiburon studio outside Orlando. ^ EA Sports’ ratings are on a 1 to 99 scale. ^ Not counting the overall rating, which just serves as a composite of a player’s component attributes. ^ There aren’t even college ratings to fall back on anymore; EA Sports put its NCAA Football series on hold in 2013. ^ Typically watched on the NFL’s RedZone channel. ^ In fact, the overall rating generally doesn’t use all — or even most — of the 43 component attributes at its disposal. Many categories effectively receive a weight of zero. ^ After a little digging, I found that the “press” rating measures a very specific skill: the defensive back’s ability to jam a receiver at the line of scrimmage while lining up in tight coverage. ^ In that class-action lawsuit, a group of retired NFL players sued the NFL Players Association — and won — over royalties that the union received from sales of Madden games containing classic teams with unnamed players whose ratings bore a striking resemblance to the talents of those teams’ real-life members. The unnamed players had “the same height, same ethnicity, same uniform number, same position,” Good said. “Although those things are very substantial in identifying a person, it was also that they would perform as you would expect that player to have performed in real life.” ^ As NBA Jam illustrates, there’s no limit to how much a video game can crank up the dial on pure athleticism. ^ Brady and Rodgers boast throwing power ratings of 93 and 95, respectively; Manning sits at 85. ^ Both Wayne and White boast speed ratings beneath the average of 90 for receivers in “Madden NFL 15”. ^ Front Page Sports: Football Pro Sierra Online’s “Front Page Sports: Football Pro,” regarded as the most realistic football simulation of its time, came out in 1993 and had eight ratings. Walker added that he never considered me one of his top rowers. “Even though you pushed yourself at practice, you lacked that same self-discipline away from practice and would often stumble into morning practices having not slept the night before,” he said. That is entirely correct. ^ Craig M. Booth’s excellent NFL height/weight charts inspired the scatter-plots in this article. ^ I have not. ^ Presumably to be used in event of a successful play in-game, so essentially unnecessary. ^ I just made a Manningface. ^ Using the 2014 roster each time. ^ Throw Power 0yds Moore’s employer, Electronic Arts, is the world’s fifth-biggest game publisher by revenue, and Madden is among its most popular titles. The franchise has generated more than $4 billion in revenue since its debut in 1988. Yet for all of EA’s resources, Moore performs his czar duties in surprising solitude. He’s assisted by a former Madden tester who oversees players’ cosmetic details4 and the usual barrage of (ever-civil) feedback on Twitter. But when it comes to the task of managing a database of more than 100,000 player attributes, one of the best-selling sports franchises in gaming history largely leaves matters up to one man. The Walk-On Donny Moore at his cubicle at EA / Photo by Erika Larsen “The possibilities are endless.” Walt Hickey is FiveThirtyEight’s lead writer for lifestyle. Deep Accuracy 0/5 Translating the athletic skills of flesh-and-blood humans into digital form has been a necessary part of sports gaming as long as real-life players have been incorporated into the software. According to Good, that practice dates at least5 as far back as the 1984 release of “Micro League Baseball” for the Commodore 64. “Micro League” was among the first sports simulations with a license to use Major League Baseball players on team rosters, an innovation that helped usher in the modern era of sports gaming. Developers were suddenly presented with a novel problem: having to represent actual players’ likenesses within the technical constraints of the day. One solution? Assigning numerical skill ratings to help differentiate good players from bad. “They were transitioning from primitive video games that were just trying to approximate the basic acts of a sport,” Good told me, pointing to the Atari 2600’s sports titles as examples of early games without rated players. “Basically, all players perform equally,” Good said. “They just wanted [to know]: ‘Do we have three outs and three strikes? You can throw the ball from third to first to put a guy out?’ ” But with the advent of licensed games, the stakes were raised. “You want Kirk Gibson to play differently from Tony Gwynn,” Good said. The method of “Micro League Baseball” was to algorithmically translate a player’s real-world statistical benchmarks — his batting average or home-run total, for instance — into skill ratings that would presumably6 spit similar numbers back out on the other side of the simulation. It was effectively the computerized version of older board games like All-Star Baseball whose colorful spinners reduced the essence of a ballplayer to a series of probabilities, locked in an eternal marriage with chance.7 But player performance is notoriously more difficult to quantify in football than in baseball. On the gridiron, detailed individual statistics are kept for only a handful of positions, and those numbers frequently miss the whole story because of interactions between 11 players on each side of the ball. Game developers quickly realized that football players, in contrast with their cousins in baseball, would need to be graded on a wider variety of skills — and that ratings-makers would have to temper the science with a whole lot of art. Madden Rating Adjusted 64 A Rating-Changing MomentNov. 23, 2014 A 75 overall rating for a rookie receiver is nothing to sneeze at, but that was just the beginning for the New York Giants wideout. Beckham recorded 31 catches in his first six games, raising his rating to an 80 overall by Week 11. And in front a national TV audience the next week, he hauled in 10 balls for 146 yards against the Dallas Cowboys — 43 yards of which came on arguably the greatest catch in NFL history. Beckham’s rating would increase by 10 more points, and he ended the year with huge upgrades in awareness, route-running, catching in traffic — and, of course, spectacular catch. Take, for example, a player’s trucking score, which captures his ability to run over a defender. Mine ended up being 9 out of 100, which makes me highly unlikely to take on Jadeveon Clowney and prevail. But my interaction with Clowney has an element of randomness — that weighted dice roll could lead to luck for me and misfortune for him, which would mean I’d lower my shoulder and it would somehow push him aside. When I walked on the field to try out for the game, I found this idea oddly comforting. On the early December day I visited his cramped cubicle, tucked away in a corner of an office building on the EA Sports campus near Orlando, Moore was putting the last touches on a roster update that would be downloaded later in the week by PlayStation and Xbox owners around the globe. When he was finished, 577 players saw some aspect of their skills re-evaluated on the basis of the previous week’s action. It’s an activity that Moore repeats every week of the season in an attempt to ensure that Madden imitates NFL reality. Reggie Wayne The effects of the ratings on actual gameplay can be arcane for even the most seasoned Madden veterans. Perhaps no one outside of EA Sports has spent more time contemplating Madden’s inner workings than SB Nation’s Jon Bois, the creator of Breaking Madden, a football column that doubles as an absurdist meditation on the game itself. But Bois confessed that he still can’t quite figure out what some of the rating categories actually do for players on the virtual gridiron. “There are definitely more obscure settings,” Bois said. “There’s a slider called ‘press,’ which I have no idea what it means. I set it to zero every time, and I still have no idea what it does, or what ‘press’ even is.”15 Neil Paine @Neil_Paine It’s all laughs for Bois, who excels at turning Madden into surreal comedy. But the cryptic nature of the game’s growing set of player attributes can also have frustrating consequences for serious gamers. “The unfortunate thing for Madden is that a lot of [its] player ratings are opaque,” USgamer senior editor Kat Bailey told me. “There are so many systems going on that you don’t always know which [ratings] affect which [systems].” How Madden helped a schlub like me make it into the NFL Reuben Fischer-Baum @reubenfb Speed Making The First String 2014-15 When “Madden NFL 15” shipped, the third-year linebacker had an overall rating of 64 and was buried on Denver’s bench. But after an injury to Danny Trevathan in August, Marshall joined the Broncos’ starting lineup. After he put together four straight games with a Pro Football Focus grade of +1.0 or better by midseason, Marshall was rated 75 overall with vastly increased awareness, tackling, zone coverage and play recognition ratings. By Week 14, he carried an 81 overall rating, up a league-high 17 from where he’d started the season. Medium Routes 0/2 Short Routes 0/3 Hidden Skill Set Reading defenses,calling audibles Adjusted 75 Footnotes Interactive 40-Yard Dash 0.0 sec Hickey’s best scores for combine drills. Next: Reggie Wayne Mute Video Physical Talent Throwing Power 3 Cone 0.0 sec “Some designers and producers complain that there are too many ratings,” Moore said of his colleagues. “They ask, ‘How can we limit the number of ratings?’ But I would argue you make players more vanilla with fewer numbers.” That’s why Moore wants to continue adding categories even if it makes his job progressively more daunting. “The developers and programmers hate this,” he said, “but it would be great to do more ratings.” He then launched into an only-half-joking suggestion that the game might add a long-snapping rating someday. When Moore sits down to build a player’s ratings for the newest version of Madden, he goes through one of two separate processes, depending on whether the player is a veteran or a rookie. Each type of player offers its own challenges. Veterans have existing ratings from previous games, but the degree to which each of their categories must be changed is uncertain. Rookies, meanwhile, must be created completely from scratch.12 For the past few versions of the game, users can download Moore’s latest roster update every week of the season via Xbox Live or the PlayStation Network. That means a player’s ratings fluctuate based on how he plays each time he takes the field. To figure out whose ratings to tweak and by how much, Moore said he combines his observations and notes taken during games13 with subsequent film study, conventional statistics, and — increasingly — advanced metrics from outlets such as Football Outsiders (particularly for schedule strength) and Pro Football Focus. “The big factor during the season is stat-based,” Moore said. “The advanced metric sites like Pro Football Focus, like the Football Outsiders, this guy named Ryan Riddle — [a] former NFL player who actually does a blog that has a lot of great information — those types of things bring out the snap-by-snap look on a player. And that, to me, gives a truer look in terms of a player’s value, rather than the conventional ‘how many receiving yards’ or ‘what was the completion percentage for the quarterback.’ ” Pulling all that data together, however, is when Moore’s instincts take over. Listening to him describe the process of rating a Madden player across all 43 categories, I began to realize that he has unwittingly adopted a sort of ad hoc Bayesian updating process. He said there’s a bit of “What have you done for me lately?” in the ratings but that certain categories are fundamentally more or less prone to short-term adjustments — another Bayesian-sounding notion. “Speed largely stays the same,” Moore said, “although when guys get hurt, I will make a change to [their] speed and agility” — a fact Cam Newton came to know firsthand. “Carry rating can be in flux if a guy fumbles a few times,” Moore continued. “Every position has certain ratings more impacted in-season than others.” Meanwhile, a category like “spectacular catch” can change on the basis of a single play. Moore defended the policy, saying that this particular rating has little to no effect on actual gameplay — but it underscores the ad hoc nature of some of Moore’s changes. Such modifications will take a veteran player through the end of the season. Moore makes additional adjustments over the summer based on age-related factors and other reports coming out of OTAs and training camps. “In the offseason, I look for guys trending up — young guys — or down — older players,” Moore said. As for the rookies, their creation process dominates Moore’s spring schedule. Starting around March, Moore begins sketching out the ratings framework for projected draftees using a series of templates for each position. Working with measurables from the scouting combine and pro days, he establishes a player’s ratings in categories such as speed and strength, which are almost directly tied to the drills performed by prospects in advance of the NFL draft. For instance, a 4.50-second time in the 40-yard dash will usually earn a prospect a speed rating of 89, barring particularly strong scouting comments about his fleetness of foot (or lack thereof). At the same time, Moore dives into the various public pre-draft scouting reports for each player, marking down pluses and minuses when consistent themes emerge and applying those adjustments to the templates in areas where the raw combine measurables are less useful, such as coverage skills or play recognition. Hidden Skill Set Knack for getting open This did not lend itself to a great deal of differentiation between players. The assortment of skills that needed to be collected for each player grew as football games progressed through the 1990s. By the end of the decade, EA Sports’ NCAA Football series9 assigned 14 attributes to every player in the game,10 while Madden began handing out 17. With the advent of fifth-generation consoles, the degree of complexity in simulating football increased dramatically, requiring a wider range of player attributes to feed into the new game engines. “Quarterback decision-making is the most difficult thing to simulate,” Moore said. “We’re trying to simulate strengths and weaknesses as best we can within the game, but how you play the game is still you.” 205 Pounds Weight When I asked Moore what types of players Madden had the most difficulty simulating, two archetypes sprung to his mind. “There’s the Peyton Manning guy — not [Tom] Brady or [Aaron] Rodgers because they have strong arms18 — but the quarterback that’s pure decision-making, accuracy and touch,” Moore said. “And the crafty veteran wide receiver with the ability to find holes in zone [coverage], like Reggie Wayne or Roddy White.”19 As he is wont to do, Moore suggested the latter could be better simulated with even more ratings or traits. “We could rate if a receiver was on the same wavelength with his QB,” he offered. After all, Moore loves to add to Madden’s stable of ratings. His pet example is passing accuracy, which was originally represented by a single rating but is now broken down into three separate classifications by distance. In previous versions of the game, the single rating was applied to the sureness of every throw, which failed to capture a big part of what makes each quarterback unique. In reality, some QBs have better accuracy on short tosses than deep bombs (think Brady), while others are better at judging long throws than short passes (Joe Flacco comes to mind). By splitting pass types into subcategories, Moore thinks he is better able to represent the characteristics that define different quarterbacks. Greater rating detail has also recently enabled Moore to address one of the criticisms that has dogged sports games — and Madden in particular — from time immemorial: that fast players are fundamentally overvalued. (Regarding the tendency for digital speedsters to far surpass the skills of their real-life counterparts, ESPN’s Patrick Hruby once mused that “Oakland Raiders boss Al Davis should have been a game programmer.”) Moore doesn’t shy away from that critique. “When you make a guy fast in a video game, he’s just a little too effective,” he said. Take receiver Darrius Heyward-Bey, a former track standout who hasn’t exactly had a great NFL career despite ranking among the league’s fastest players. Heyward-Bey is just the kind of one-dimensional speedster whose avatar traditionally wreaks undue havoc in Madden, but Moore insists the revamped ratings have made it more difficult for those players to trick the game’s engine. Bailey confirmed this development. “It was true for a long time [that] the little speedy guys could just get open, and that was that,” she said. “I don’t think that’s as much of the case anymore.” But while speed can be mitigated, Moore granted that there’s no good way to overcome the problem of simulating a quarterback like Manning, whose most important skills — reading defenses, calling audibles, seeing things on the field that no one else can, and making sound decisions — are instantly negated when a gamer picks up the controller. Comments KICKING/PUNTING Madden Rating No player to participate in the 40-yard dash at the NFL combine since 1999 had a 40-yard time as bad as mine.2 The closest was Regis Crawford, a 316-pound offensive guard out of Arizona State who after the 2004 combine went undrafted. Crawford still managed to run the dash 0.70 seconds faster than me. Next up came agility drills — one shuttle run with three cones in an L-shape, another a 20-yard back-and-forth — that would determine how agile I wasn’t. I have the maneuverability of a rudderless aircraft carrier. Moore charitably characterized my style as “a real north and south kind of player.” Then came a lunging jump, in which I posted a consistent 6-foot, 5-inch leap. Moore seemed less appalled than he had all day. “Not bad there,” he said. It was one of the only times I felt anything approaching pride. Footnotes Tecmo Super Bowl Nintendo’s seminal football game was released in 1991 and used no more than seven rating categories for any player. The game wasn’t super realistic. Bo Jackson was an all-time great in the NFL; he was superhuman in Tecmo. by Walt Hickey graphics by Reuben Fischer-Baum photography by Marius Bugge But these days, I don’t have to step on the field to know what happens when I step on the field. We have Madden for that. And shockingly, the people behind Madden were willing to turn me into a guinea pig. All I had to do was give them 36 hours and sit in front of a panopticon of cameras, and they’d turn my corporeal self into a digital one. I booked a flight to Florida. The most pressing issue on my mind: what my Madden ratings would be. The game (the most recent edition is “Madden NFL 15”) rates players on a scale from 0 to 99, basing overall scores on 43 categories, including trucking, deep passing, strength and agility. A guy like me was virgin territory for Donny Moore, the Madden Ratings Czar. How exactly would he quantify the football ability of a person with hardly any? That I was essentially a rookie made Moore’s job even harder. As my colleague Neil Paine explained, rookies require an intense amount of research — game tape, college stats, combine performance — because they have no NFL experience to use for a rating. The only way Moore could draw up my forecast was by watching me play. On the agenda: the 40-yard dash, agility drills, and basic throwing and catching evaluations. After that was all over, I figured I’d be one of Jon Bois’s Breaking Madden creations. For the past few years, in a series for SB Nation, Bois has been tweaking players’ stats to show what happens when those players are made superhuman or all too human. I expected to be in the latter category. But I wanted my avatar to at least get a point on the board, at least complete a couple of passes, and at least lead a team to one victory over several simulations (even if I broke an interception record for good measure). I wanted to show that the average dude could survive the rigors of the NFL. I’ve never exactly been an athlete. The last organized sport I attempted was three semesters of club crew in college. I reached out to my former coach, Nathan Walker, to get an independent assessment of my athletic priors. In an email, Walker said he didn’t imagine I was “the type of kid who defined himself through sports while growing up.” That is an understatement. I went to an elite-football high school but ran the debate team. He said that in my first year of rowing, I was “clumsy and awkward,” and my limbs didn’t quite go where I wanted them to. Nonetheless, he said, I was “a pure joy to watch” because I was passionate about it.1 Essentially, like most Americans, I’m not exactly out of shape, but I’m not exactly in shape either. I’m generally just a shape. Original 64 Maybe the only thing causing me to play poorly was that I wasn’t playing as myself. I challenged Madden’s creative director, Rex Dickson, to a scrimmage. Starting at QB for the Giants: Walt Hickey. Hickey did not have a good day. He threw 7 for 25, threw three interceptions and was sacked three times. The Giants lost 42-7. The only points came thanks to wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr., who could make any quarterback look good. He scored on a short pass that he turned into a 94-yard touchdown. My only comfort was to imagine the great headline The New York Post would put on its back page the next day: “Hickey Fails to Leave a Mark.” The Virtual NFL February 26, 2015 I was on the 50-yard line, trying to make sense of the long slant route ahead of me. My debut was not going well. I was winded, slightly dehydrated and kicking myself after a day of mediocre runs and failed catches. The next pass was my last chance to impress, and I knew the cameras would be on me. When I heard “hike,” I took off. Eight yards out, I saw the ball above in a spiral. I jumped for it pitifully … and hit the ground. The ball was not in my arms. Before that pass, I knew I wasn’t cut out for the NFL. But when it sailed over my head, something else became clear: I was barely cut out for a video-game facsimile of the league. I was in Orlando with a crew of people who work on Madden, EA Sports’ premier football simulation, because I, like many obnoxious New York Giants fans, once had a fleeting moment of hubris. Sometime during QB Eli Manning’s 97 interceptions over the past five years, I thought: “Christ, even I could throw a better pass than that.” I cannot throw a better pass than that. Yet there was a sort of perverse appeal to the damage I’d bring to the Giants if I were swapped with Manning. What would happen if a schlub like me played in a league as unforgiving as the NFL? Listen to Walt Hickey and Neil Paine discuss their reporting and how they broke Madden. Clockwise, from top left: Hickey poses in front of the cameras; the computer builds a 3D model of Hickey’s face based on his photos; skin tone and facial detail are added; Hickey’s final rendering Case StudyOdell Beckham Jr.Rookie Player Broad Jump 0’0″ Position WR Position QB 6’1″ Height Bailey offered an illustration from franchise mode, in which a gamer uses a finite supply of experience points to boost players’ skills. “It can be unclear which ratings you want to increase,” she said. Spending experience points on awareness, for instance, will almost always increase a player’s overall rating — but for defensive players and even quarterbacks, that boost won’t cause them to play better when they’re being controlled in-game. Meanwhile, wide receivers can actually see tangible in-game benefits from a higher awareness score. Confused yet? “I’ve heard it speculated that even the Madden team themselves don’t really know what’s going on,” Bailey said. “Because they’ve got years upon years of systems and code just layered on top of one another, where it’s not always entirely clear how they’re interacting. “It’s kind of a crazy system.” Whatever the virtues and drawbacks of Madden’s player ratings, though, they’re just a starting point. The game must still be played. Neil Paine is a senior sportswriter for FiveThirtyEight. “You’re going to be setting new ground in how low we go with the ratings,” Moore told me on my second day in Florida. But I still had a chance to succeed. In Madden, everything’s a weighted dice roll — one player slamming into another isn’t an athletic act, it’s a probabilistic one. Even bad players like me could get lucky now and then. Next: Michael Vick Mute Video Case StudyBrandon MarshallVeteran Player Gamebreakers There are certain player archetypes that have always been difficult for Madden to accurately simulate. The classic example is Michael Vick from “Madden NFL 2004“; Vick’s speed was overvalued in the game. But less egregious examples occur whenever a gamer takes control of a player whose real-life counterpart possesses immense physical gifts but lacks awareness. The converse is also true; players whose defining skill is football IQ — Peyton Manning and Reggie Wayne, for example — are inept in the hands of an inept gamer. Watch the gamebreakers 24 Years Age Early player ratings were simplistic. The legendary “Tecmo Super Bowl,” released in late 1991, kept 14 ratings categories in total. But only a few affected in-game performance for any given position. Meanwhile, the initial version of Sierra Online’s “Front Page Sports: Football Pro,” regarded among the most sophisticated football simulations of the mid-1990s, tracked just eight rating categories for each player,8 with the same traits taking on radically different meanings depending on the player’s position. (For instance, a quarterback’s strength rating might refer to powerful throws, while the same category for a lineman would control his ability to block.) Two months later, Moore and company asked me to return to Florida for the big reveal: what I’d look like as a real (fake), live (artificial) NFL (Madden) player. When I was first in Florida, EA mapped my face for an avatar by putting me in front of 12 high-definition cameras, each poised at a slightly different angle. It looked like what Jeremy Bentham would have made if he had gone into photography after he was tired of designing prisons. I posed seven ways — one mugshot, left and right profile shots, a natural smile,4 one with my mouth slightly open,5 one with a wrinkled forehead and eight chins, and one screaming. When I saw the photos in December, they looked like I had just walked out of an anti-methamphetamine advertisement. The photos came with polarized flashes that stripped my face of any shadow. Zooming in on the high-def shots made it look like I had slept in hot grease. Will Gibson, the technician who took the photos, said they made me look sort of like Ray Romano. But this, he said, was the point. “Put Brad Pitt in front of this,” he said, “and he’d look like Steve Buscemi.” For example, one of the most important categories when computing a quarterback’s overall rating is awareness, which is based on experience and attempts to quantify factors like decision-making and depth of playbook knowledge. Awareness clearly affects how computer-controlled quarterbacks play the game; the lower the rating, the more likely a CPU opponent is to throw into coverage or miss open receivers. But despite its heavy weighting in the overall rating formula, a quarterback’s awareness score makes no difference when a human is controlling him. When you, the gamer, are in charge, it’s up to you to be “aware” for the avatar you’re controlling. Bois described the same conundrum using a basketball analogy. “I’ve found that the video-game version of J.R. Smith is incredible,” he said. “He’s just way better than he is in real life, and I think the reason is because you get to make the decisions and not him. He’s an amazing player, but once you distill him to his physical self, he’s just unstoppable half the time.” So at what point does an unaware Peyton Manning — or an aware Smith — cease to be a true representation of the original? It’s an interesting philosophical issue and one connected to the delicate balancing act of favoring skilled gamers while having virtual players mirror the strengths and weaknesses of their real-life counterparts. “It’s a fine line,” Dickson said. “You want to make sure that somebody with great stick skills can still win and be successful but at the same time not transcend a really crappy team and all of a sudden they can beat anyone.” When that equilibrium is disturbed, the game can sometimes even be criticized as too realistic. In 2013, testers from Houston complained to Dickson after playing as the Texans’ undrafted rookie quarterback Case Keenum. “They all said, ‘[With] these computer physics, I can’t have fun with this guy: Every pass is inaccurate,’ ” Dickson said. “We’re watching film on [Keenum], and it’s like, ‘Well, he’s a third-stringer. Every pass is inaccurate. This is real life.’ ” “They said to us, ‘Well, if I’m good and making good decisions, I should be able to make good reads and get the pass there,’ ” Dickson continued. “But all of a sudden then you’re making guys like Geno Smith look like Peyton Manning, and your stick skills are now superseding the simulation. We’ve actually had that in the game before, and it didn’t go over well. People reject that. “You shouldn’t be able, just because you’re really good at Madden, to make Geno Smith all of a sudden awesome. Geno Smith, even if he makes a good read, is still an inaccurate passer. That’s just the way it works in the NFL, and that’s modeled in our simulation.” Polygon’s Good used a baseball example to illustrate this tug of war between enjoyment and realism: “How do you make failing seven out of 10 times fun?” It’s a challenge that doesn’t seem to be completely solvable using player ratings, no matter how much faith Moore places in them. Then again, I doubt it will stop him from trying. “In a perfect world, in ‘Madden 2037,’ we might have [ratings] split into 10 or 15 different awareness-type categories,” Moore said, still rattling off items from his wish list. “Like awareness around the end zone, awareness in the fourth quarter … Finally, after all the component categories are set for both rookies and veterans, the numbers are used to generate the fabled Overall Rating. When I asked Moore about this, I expected him to decline to comment, citing a proprietary formula shrouded in secrecy. Instead, he cheerfully called up a spreadsheet containing the values that go into computing a player’s overall grade (and later e-mailed it to us). And somewhat anticlimactically, the overall rating is simply a weighted average of a player’s ratings across the 43 skill categories tracked by Madden, with different categories taking on more weight depending on the position.14 For example, the most heavily weighted categories for quarterbacks in “Madden NFL 15” are awareness and throwing power (each contributes about one-fifth of a quarterback’s overall rating), accuracy by zone (short and medium accuracy are both slightly more valuable than deep accuracy), and play-action passing. Together, those categories make up 89 percent of the overall grade for QBs, with the rest of the weight given to throwing on the run, agility, speed and acceleration. Short Accuracy 0/5 Just lost ALL respect for the madden ratings creators! They got russell wilson the same rating as Tom Brady! GTFOH!!!!!— ☆G.O.A.T☆ (@YoungPrevo) July 22, 2014 Receiving “Quarterback decision-making is the most difficult thing to simulate,” Moore said. Position QB Michael Vick Deep Routes 0/2 Actual participation was out of the question. This is no longer George Plimpton’s NFL. The size of an NFL player has ballooned — players are taller and larger than ever before. Between 1974 and 1999, rookie offensive linemen got 24 percent heavier. I’m not getting near the turf of an actual football field. Plus, my insurance isn’t that great. Madden has generated more than $4 billion in revenue over its 26-year lifetime. Yet for all EA’s resources, Moore performs his czar duties in surprising solitude. Continue Reading Mute Video Walter Hickey Monroe, N.Y. Moore’s job has morphed from a behind-the-scenes technician to a sort of celebrity — and villain — in gaming circles. And in an increasingly data-heavy sports landscape, it’s a role that sits squarely in two intersections of growing importance — between scouting and analytics, simulation and reality. Because in both Madden and the post-“Moneyball” sports world, humans become a collection of data points and then are turned back into a digital approximation of themselves. It was against this backdrop that Moore began his professional affiliation with EA. In 1998, he was still a student at the University of Central Florida, pursuing a degree in political science, when in November when he noticed advertisements for an “NCAA Football 99” tournament at the student union. Moore and his roommates were devotees of the game — he recalls elaborate house rules requiring that a witness be present every time a game was played in the friends’ shared Dynasty Mode savefile. On a whim, he skipped class, entered the contest using Florida State as his team, and won first prize. Moore’s detailed knowledge of the game’s minutiae impressed NCAA Football developers on hand for the tournament. On the spot, they offered him a part-time job testing the coming edition of the game, a break he would later parlay into a full-time gig as an EA Sports football tester. Playing and testing the games, Moore got a firsthand look at the give-and-take between gameplay and player ratings. He recalls the time a long-forgotten defensive tackle for the University of Kentucky inadvertently became a superstar after a typo assigned him a speed rating11 of 85 — blazing for a lineman — and when the Oakland Raiders, long known for their real-life fixation on speed, became unstoppable because the Madden game engine translated the overall velocity of the Raiders’ roster into far better virtual performances than the team was capable of in reality. Moore would eventually be promoted to a designer and associate producer along his path to Ratings Czar, but the relationship between Moore’s testing background and his current job is clear. “The [ratings] are probably the single biggest factor in gameplay,” Moore said. And the ratings have far more moving parts now than when Moore began working at EA. Each player in the game is graded in 43 categories — many of which were added when Madden transitioned from the sixth generation of consoles to the seventh. There are also nearly 20 new player-tendency tags, known as “traits,” that control specific player behaviors. PASSING When I first met my avatar, it was like staring into a mirror set up across the uncanny valley. My facial features were nearly exact, down to the barely noticeable scar on my chin. But I looked disoriented — even more disoriented than I was on the day of the shoot. My neck lolled; my eyes were glazed over; my blinking was algorithmic. My avatar played just as strangely as it looked. We’re used to playing Madden with athletes who have remarkable skill sets; they move quickly, consistently and responsively. I did not. It was like driving in the snow: You know how the car is supposed to move, but it just doesn’t behave as expected. This is what happens when your Madden score is 12. A 12 out of 100 is bad. Very bad. The lowest-rated player in “Madden NFL 15” is Jacksonville Jaguars long snapper Carson Tinker, who’s a 41. Peyton Manning Extra Points 0/4 Walt Hickey 17 Throw Power 15 Throw On Run 14 Strength 03 Deep Accuracy 00 Consistency 12 Overall Long 0 yds Despite the praise during practice — that I had more of an offensive-guard skill set, that I could be a tight end, that I was “a real north and south kind of player” — when it comes down to it, I’m clumsy and awkward, my limbs don’t quite go where I want them to go, and at best, it’s just fun to watch me. Generally speaking, I don’t think a regular person could compete with the pros. Most people are somewhat good at something. But greatness — regularly scheduled weekly articulations of greatness — is something that just can’t be turned on. And yet I won some games as quarterback. In the 15 seasons that EA simulated with me as QB for the Giants,6 the team never had a winning season but did win an average of 2.9 games each year. Head coach Tom Coughlin was also fired every season. So, win some, lose some. Moore also simulated me as a receiver, kicker and punter, each of which also dragged the Giants down. The team had an average of 3.3 wins with me as a receiver, 3.5 wins with me at kicker, and 3.8 wins with me at punter. Somehow, I made 95 percent of extra-point attempts, and my average punt was 27 yards. Skeptical, I emailed Moore to see whether the game might be flawed. “It might be one of those things in our simulation where it might not simulate the Extra-Point kicks based off of ratings enough,” he said. Even my achievements may have happened in error. UPDATE (July 24, 7:15 p.m.): In July 2015, Moore announced his retirement as Madden’s Ratings Czar, leaving EA Sports to join the daily fantasy sports company FanDuel. Madden NFL 16, which will be released in August, will be the final game in the series to contain ratings curated by Moore. CORRECTION (Feb. 25, 1:23 p.m.): A previous version of this article incorrectly characterized Tecmo Super Bowl’s rating system. The game kept 14 rating categories in total, not per player. Moore looked relieved during the scrimmage. My abysmal performance was proof that Madden really is a simulation of the NFL: A player who somehow lucks into the league without any skills really doesn’t have a chance. He’d have to rely on his teammates to compensate. Thankfully, Madden doesn’t allow for locker-room coups. I will never on my best day be as good as Manning on his worst day. And yet, Madden was way too kind. The Giants should have been so, so much worse with me at the helm. My avatar couldn’t have been rated much lower. I was far closer to a zero rating than I was to the lowest legitimate athlete in the game (Tinker, the long snapper). Despite that, my avatar still managed to lead a team to a little less than three wins a year on average? That doesn’t make sense. The Giants went 6-10 last season. There’s no way Eli Manning is only three wins above Walt Hickey. All we need to do to demonstrate this is to look at the team that performed exactly as I expect mine would: the 2008 Detroit Lions. Although that team was among the worst of all time and failed to win a game, it was made up of talented players who were each still vastly better athletes than I am. Indeed, that year, the overall ratings for four Lions quarterbacks — Daunte Culpepper (80), Jon Kitna (84), Dan Orlovsky (73) and Drew Stanton (77) — vastly exceeded my rating. Factor in my shocking kicking performance (maybe I could make 95 percent of extra-point attempts on, say, the moon or some other low-gravity satellite), and I think that even my low stats fail to encapsulate just how bad (or rather how normal) I am. Madden’s simulation is geared to work within a realm of athleticism where I do not reside. To articulate my actual performance on the field, I’d probably need a negative rating. If you hang around the Madden studio enough, you’ll hear a curious phrase tossed around, a relic from games of a decidedly different genre and medium: “Dice rolls.” Although Madden takes pains to immerse gamers in the fantasy that they are controlling real NFL players, every interaction between two players in the game is also dictated by underlying probabilities, weighted by the various ratings of the respective players. As Rex Dickson, Madden’s creative director, said: “The way the game works on a high level is that when two players run into each other and are about to do an interaction — let’s say it’s a ball-carrier and a linebacker — it’s going to take several ratings and throw them into a formula and do a dice roll. “The dice roll is how we get the randomness. So it’s basically his break-tackle chance against your tackle chance and then a dice roll on top of that. The ratings mismatch is your modifier on the dice roll. If he’s 10 points higher than you for his tackle rating, the dice roll is going to be favored in his favor to get the tackle versus the flip where it’d favor the break-tackle.” After hours of hearing this kind of talk during our visit to EA’s studios, my colleague Walt Hickey had a realization: This is basically Dungeons & Dragons for sports fans. If an obsessive following is a requirement for that comparison, consider Madden certified. The annual unveiling of Madden’s player ratings is an event unto itself. Beyond just Newton, many NFL players grouse to Moore about their numbers. (Kerry Rhodes, while playing safety for the New York Jets, made a YouTube video titled “WTF Madden!” demonstrating pretty conclusively that his throwing power rating was too low.) There are also sites where amateurs, apparently dissatisfied with Moore’s handiwork, aim to create their own competing sets of ratings. And the ratings have even been deemed to constitute “likeness” in lawsuits such as Parrish, et. al v. NFLPA.16 Bois told me that he thought the game does about as well as it can when it comes to converting real players’ abilities into a series of numbers. “If we were going to be entirely realistic, you’d probably have to have 1,500 different skill sliders” per player, he joked. “But this is a decent way to distill it into a thing that the layman can play around with and use.” Bailey agreed. “It’s an inexact science,” she said, “but for the most part [Moore] gets it right.” Yet for all of Madden’s quest for realism, there are certain aspects of football that the game still, and may always, have trouble simulating. On one level, sports video games give regular Joes and Jills the opportunity to perform athletic feats that most could only dream about in real life — blazing runs, high-flying dunks, cannon-armed throws — and games have gotten pretty good at simulating these aspects of what it means to be a professional athlete.17 But sports video games will always struggle to accurately replicate the cerebral side of sports; that’s why it’s more difficult to simulate being Ricky Rubio than LeBron James. I asked Moore whether there were any sports that regular people could jump into and be at least a little competitive. “Poker, if you consider that a sport,” he said. Mohegan Sun has a poker tournament at the end of the month. How hard can that be? Physical Talent Agility The Virtual NFL February 25, 2015 Hunched over a keyboard, surrounded by computer monitors, Donny Moore, 37, controls the fate of the National Football League. Its players throw as hard as Moore wants. They run as fast as he says they should. And the stars of America’s most popular sport aren’t always delighted by his judgments. Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton, for instance, was upset. “I want to talk about my speed,” Moore remembers Newton saying as he clambered into Moore’s cubicle last April. Despite leading all NFL quarterbacks in rushing yards in 2013, Newton ranked as only the ninth-fastest QB in the league, according to Moore — hence Newton’s unhappiness. But as Moore wheeled around from his den of screens, he was confronted by not only Newton, but also an enormous boot on Newton’s foot, the result of recent ankle surgery. “Yeah,” Moore said as Newton hobbled toward him, “let’s talk about your speed.” Eventually, Newton was pleading with Moore to not make him slower. Such is the power afforded Moore, a hyperactive Floridian who works as the official Ratings Czar1 for EA Sports’ Madden NFL video-game franchise. In that role, Moore is tasked with assigning more than 40 numerical grades to each of the NFL’s roughly 2,600 players,2 evaluating them in categories ranging from passing accuracy to tackling ability. Moore’s process has largely been a black box, and yet it shapes how more than 5 million gamers simulate pro football — particularly because there’s no official alternative to his numbers. A decade after signing a controversial exclusivity deal with the league and the players union, Madden3 is still the only licensed NFL game in town. In fact, an entire culture has grown up around Madden and its attempts to distill human athleticism into numbers. It is all good marketing for EA Sports but also speaks to the sway Madden holds. The ratings are a de facto time capsule from the year they were produced, a digital archive that offers players some measure of immortality in a sport where the average career lasts only a shade over three years. “It’s important to these guys that they be rated 99 in speed; it’s important to somebody that he have the best arm in the game,” Owen S. Good, a writer for the video-game news site Polygon, told me. The allure of the Madden rating might also speak to the relative lack of meaningful statistics in football itself. It would be strange for a baseball player to complain about his ratings in MLB: The Show, for instance, because a realistic baseball simulator (by necessity) has ratings grounded in actual statistics. But in a sport where objective measurements are often inadequate, subjective numbers — like those generated by Moore — take on greater currency. All these factors put more pressure on Moore to produce ratings of ever-increasing accuracy even as they highlight the fundamental paradox limiting Madden’s realism: It’s nearly impossible to accurately simulate some players as long as a gamer must assume control of the athlete’s brain. read more

vfdxlutgq

Freshmans late goal lifts Ohio State womens soccer team into Sweet 16

OSU junior forward Nichelle Prince (7)during a game against Butler in the opening round of the NCAA tournament on Nov. 14 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU won 2-1. Credit: Courtesy of OSUThe Ohio State women’s soccer team (13-6-3) is headed to the Sweet 16 after defeating the Virginia Tech Hokies (15-4-2) on Friday afternoon 1-0 in the second round of the NCAA tournament. Freshman midfielder Arden Holden netted her first career goal with 11 minutes remaining to keep the Buckeyes’ postseason run afloat. With the win, the Scarlet and Gray are headed to their third Sweet 16 in the past six seasons. The beginning of the game was slow, as the first 15 minutes did not present many opportunities to score for either side. In the 20th minute, OSU finally got to a solid opportunity in the final third when senior midfielder/forward Michela Paradiso tried to curl one in from 20 yards out on the left wing but it sailed over the crossbar. Two minutes later, the Buckeyes had another opportunity to score when junior forward Lindsay Agnew sent a strong ball to junior forward Nichelle Prince, but a Virginia Tech defender cleared it away. The Hokies, who entered the game as the 14th-overall seed, were able to generate a scoring opportunity in the 43rd minute when sophomore forward Alani Johnson sent one on the frame, but OSU redshirt junior goalkeeper Jillian McVicker made a lunging save to preserve the scoreless match. The teams headed into the locker rooms at halftime tied 0-0. The Hokies led the Buckeyes 6-1 in shots, 1-0 on goal. OSU came back in the second half with plenty of opportunities to score early on, but the Buckeyes simply could not find the back of the net. In the 79th minute, the Buckeyes put the one and only goal on the board. Prince split two Virginia Tech defenders before playing the ball out to Holden who finished off the keeper. Holden has appeared in 21 of the Buckeyes’ 22 games this season, but her game-winning goal marked the first time in her young career she has scored. The final 11 minutes of play contained some opportunities for the Hokies to level the match, including a solid look off a free kick in the 87th minute, but they could not get past McVicker, meaning OSU was able to hold on for the 1-0 win. For the game, Virginia Tech held a sizable lead in shots, 20-5, including 4-2 on goal. McVicker made four saves to earn her second clean sheet of the season for OSU. The Buckeyes are set to play conference foe Penn State in the Sweet 16 after the Nittany Lions dominated Boston University in the second round, winning 6-0. In the lone meeting between the two teams during the regular season, Penn State topped OSU 2-1 on Oct. 24. With an opportunity to advance to the quarterfinals on the line, the rematch is set to take place on Sunday in State College, Pennsylvania.  Kickoff is penciled in for 1 p.m. read more

tfgjtbdph

Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller mum on football future until after Orange

Junior quarterback Braxton Miller (5) carries the ball during the Big Ten Championship game against Michigan State Dec. 7 in Indianapolis. OSU lost, 34-24. Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorOhio State junior quarterback Braxton Miller said he is going to wait until after the Buckeyes play in the Orange Bowl against Clemson to decide whether or not he will leave early for the NFL Draft.“I’m just focusing on getting better myself as an individual and getting the team ready and making sure I’m in the film room taking care of my business,” Miller said Wednesday.However, OSU’s signal caller feels he is prepared to play at the next level.“Oh, yeah. Of course, yeah. Definitely. Just like (when) I came from high school. (The) coaches (are) going to get you mentally ready for everything that you need to get ready for,” Miller said. “It’s another step in life.”OSU coach Urban Meyer said he will wait until after the season is complete before talking with players who could leave early about their future. He would not go into detail about what kind of advice he would give his star quarterback when that time comes though.“That’s between me and Braxton,” Meyer said Monday.Miller, who was named the Big Ten’s offensive player of the year for the second straight season Dec. 3, threw for 1,860 yards and 22 touchdowns with just five interceptions despite missing more than two games when he went down with a sprained MCL in his left knee against San Diego State Sept. 7. He also ran for 1,033 yards and 10 touchdowns in 2013.No. 7 OSU (12-1, 8-1) is set to play No. 12 Clemson (10-2, 7-1) in the Discover Orange Bowl Jan. 3. Kickoff is scheduled for 8:30 p.m. read more

ejtbymqql

No team better than Spain at World Cup – Alonso

first_imgXabi Alonso is adamant that there are no teams in the World Cup that are better than Spain right now and sees no reason why they cannot be considered among the favourites to claim glory in RussiaLa Roja topped their World Cup qualifying group without losing a single game and in 10 games they won nine and drew just one, as well as scoring 36 goals and conceding just three.Among the likes of Germany and Brazil, the 2010 World Cup winners are expected to be one of the prime challengers at Russia.“I’m not just saying it, but I would put them among the favourites because I don’t see any side that’s better than Spain right now. I don’t know what’s going to happen in the games though,” Alonso told FIFA.comDavid Villa, SpainQuiz: How much do you know about David Villa? Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Time to test your knowledge about Spanish legendary forward David Villa.“Germany are another of the big favourites. They’re a very strong side and they’re always there or thereabouts. The way they’ve been playing, it would be a massive surprise if they don’t make the semis, because they’re the champions and because of the new generation who’ve come into the team.“Brazil are also right in there. I think those three are above the rest.”He added: Then there’s Argentina, France and maybe a surprise or two.”Spain will begin with their World Cup campaign against Portugal on June 15.last_img read more

npmyrmnfy

Fekir to stay at Lyon

first_imgLiverpool and Real Madrid target Nabil Fekir is likely to stay at Lyon, says Aulas.Having seen his move to English side Liverpool at the start of the transfer window breakdown, Lyon president Jean Michel Aulas is confident the player will stay at the club this season.Aulas has maintained his belief that he expects his star player to play an integral part in the club’s Ligue 1 and Champions League campaign this season.Fekir was one of the standout players for Olympique Lyonnais last season drawing a lot of attention from Europe’s premier sides. His performances at club level led to him being included in France’s 23 man squad to Russia for the World Cup.The French wide-playmaker was expected to complete a £60million move to Liverpool before the start of the World Cup but the move fell through as the Merseyside club cited knee issues during his medical.Nabil FekirFekir says Liverpool lied about his injury Manuel R. Medina – September 10, 2019 According to Nabil Fekir Liverpool lied about his knee injury and that’s why the proposed move to the Reds fell apart.Whilst Liverpool aren’t the only club interested in his services, Aulas now intends to keep his star player at the club.“I think Nabil will be at OL next season,” he explained to RMC Sport on Saturday.“I have a very good relationship with all my players, so I gave him the chance to join his dream club Liverpool.”“We gave Tolisso and Umtiti the same opportunities as well, Nabil is our captain and the coach’s prerogative is that we keep him at the club for next season.”last_img read more

hnhuyhzyx

Mourinho doesnt know when United can win title

first_imgManchester United manager Jose Mourinho admits he doesn’t know when they can challenge for the title again and may rely on their rivals getting hit by FFP rules.Despite spending £360m since becoming Manchester United manager in 2016, Mourinho still believes his team is far from winning the Premier League trophy.Current Premier League champions Manchester City are now under investigation after leaked documents last month showed that the club had circumvented the Financial Fair Play rules by inflating their sponsorship income.“I don’t know,” Mourinho told Sky Sports after he asked when United will challenge for the title again.Jose Mourinho, Lionel MessiMourinho: “Lionel Messi made me a better coach” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho believes the experience of going up against Barcelona superstar Lionel Messi at Real Madrid made him a greater coach.“It depends also the way of our evolution but also the evolution of others, the ones that are above us.“If they keep going in the same direction and if their ambition, investment, everything, continues that’s one thing.“Another thing is if they stop or if Financial Fair Play makes them stop. Then we can close the gap a little bit better.”last_img read more

hnhuyhzyx

Feds Approve Texas School Accountability Plan That Includes Parts Of AF Rating

first_img Share By REUTERS/Joshua RobertsU.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos testifies to the House Appropriations Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Subcommittee on the FY2019 budget request for the Department Education on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on March 20, 2018.Texas got final approval Monday from the U.S. Department of Education for its school improvement and accountability plan, including a portion of its new system for grading schools.Texas is in the process of finalizing its plan for evaluating public schools, as the federal government transitions to a new set of policies governing how schools should use federal funding to educate students. In 2015, the federal government signed the Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA, which is intended to give states more freedom on setting goals for school districts, turning around low-performing schools and administering standardized tests. ESSA replaces the controversial No Child Left Behind Act, which had stricter regulations on how states were expected to hold schools accountable for educating students.Each state was required to submit a plan last year, including a rundown on how it would rate and evaluate its schools, intended to take effect this school year.Texas submitted a plan that includes parts of its newly updated accountability system for rating and evaluating schools and districts on a scale from A to F. The state Legislature made final revisions to the accountability system last spring, replacing a pass/fail system; school districts will receive their first grades this August.Schools and districts will be graded in three categories: student achievement, student progress and closing the gaps.“Texas’ plan met the requirements of the law, therefore I have approved it,” U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos said in a statement Monday. “I look forward to seeing how Texas embraces the flexibility afforded by ESSA to innovate on behalf of the Lone Star State’s students.”In the spring, Texas will open up public comment on the A-F system, beginning the process of creating a manual for how schools and districts will be graded. State education officials say it’s not too late for parents and educators to suggest changes to the accountability system despite the fact that it has received federal approval.“Should the agency receive additional feedback during the A-F accountability public comment period that leads to decisions different from what has been approved in our ESSA plan, Commissioner [Mike] Morath will submit amendments to USDE that reflect input from stakeholders,” TEA spokesperson Lauren Callahan said in a statement. This article originally appeared in The Texas Tribune at https://www.texastribune.org/2018/03/26/texas-makes-accountability-decisions-federal-deadline/.last_img read more

fyyyrvtlm

The life and times of women who influenced Tagore

first_imgBased on the life of Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore and his extended family and friends, this semi-fictional book tries to capture several vignettes of Bengali society and its culture of that era. By doing so, it also gives us an insight into the larger canvas that was India.Jorasanko, a neighbourhood north of Kolkata, has been linked to Tagore’s name forever. The book tells, with great aplomb, the story of Digambari, Prince Dwarkanath’s wife, who banished her illustrious husband from her household because he went against the dharma of his Vaishnav ancestors by hosting receptions where meat and liquor were served. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThis uncompromising act of Rabindranath’s grandmother showed the existence of women of substance in a household that can be termed as Bengal’s first family. One is tempted to raise at least half a toast to this act of early rebellion, even though it was against the freewheeling lifestyle of a man who also hobnobbed extensively with Europeans. As painted by the author Aruna Chakravarti, the novel is largely set between the years 1859 and 1902 when a feudal mindset was slowly, reluctantly giving way to a liberal, westernised one. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveAt the hub of the transition was Jnanadanandini, the dynamo wife of Maharshi Debendranath’s second son Satyendranath Tagore. Jnanadanandini has been dignified with the title of the “first modern woman” of Bengal when modernism was still in its infancy. She was perhaps one of the strongest influences on Rabindranath, who would eventually go on to change the face of Bengali literature forever.Providing a deeper insight into Tagore’s life, the author shows how Rabindranath flourished under the influence of Jnanadanandini, though it was his other sister-in-law, Kadambari, who discovered his potential as a poet and helped him to free the muses trapped within. Chakravarti, an academic, creative writer and translator, took the milieu in which the poet-philosopher lived, anchoring her vivid imagination to what would have been, rather than what really was.The book explores Rabindranath Tagore’s engagement with the freedom movement and his vision for holistic education, bringing alive his latter-day inspirations, Ranu Adhikari and Victoria Ocampo, mapping the histories of Tagore’s women, even as it goes on to describe the twilight years of one of the greatest luminaries of modern times.Rabindranath’s wife Mrinalini was unfortunate in the way she has been viewed by his contemporaries and succeeding generations of his readers as an “unworthy spouse” of one of the greatest men of the land.But in the author’s eyes she was not an unworthy spouse if one takes into consideration the restrictions under which women of the time were placed. Which should mean that the women who rose above their calling in the household did it despite those extreme odds. The book also delves deeply into the disquiet in the poet’s heart, his sadness and melancholy. How unhappy he was when he found that his ailing daughter was not getting adequate care from her in-laws.Amidst the many unhappiness, the bard was also busy building his dream project at Santiniketan – Visva-Bharati – which would become one of the finest universities of the land. The book is a sequel to the author’s ‘Jorasanko’, published in 2013. Both are part-fictional accounts of life and times of Tagore and the many women who influenced him in the ancestral mansion.The background themes of this rich palette include the Bengal Renaissance, the socio-political scene of India, the British colonial rule and the proposal by Lord Curzon to divide the poet’s beloved land into two.The fiction merges so well with the colours of history that you cannot help but let your senses ride along, in a journey which is both rich and satisfying. Read the book in one sitting if you can – the age comes alive and grabs you for a lasting impact.last_img read more