No need to go to Colombo says UN

He told the Colombo Gazette that some 10 bus loads of people mainly from Vavuniya and Mannar, which were preparing to leave Vavuniya, were blocked by the police.Ganeshan said that the police had warned the people that there was information the buses may come under attack when heading to Colombo. The police had this week blocked a group of people heading to Colombo from the north to take part in a demonstration over the disappeared, Tamil politician Mano Ganeshan said. The United Nations (UN) says there is no need for people from the north of Sri Lanka to go to Colombo to provide information to the UN on any issue.Responding to reports that hundreds of Tamils from the north were prevented from heading to Colombo this week to stage a demonstration and handover a petition to the UN country office, a UN spokesman in New York said there are other ways to communicate with the UN. “Well, there would be other conduits to be able to provide information if people feel they have information that they wish to hand over to the United Nations.  There are other ways to do it if they cannot reach Colombo.  So I am sure that that would be possible, to be able to receive information and not just via the country team in the country,” UN Spokesman Martin Nesirky told reporters in New York. The US Embassy in Colombo had called on the Sri Lankan authorities to allow free movement of these citizens as the right to freely express opinions is universal and protected under Sri Lankan and international law.The Embassy also said that the United States is constructively working with international partners to support these basic freedoms through the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) resolution in Geneva.“We continue to urge the Government of Sri Lanka to follow through on its own commitments to its people by implementing recommendations made in their Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission (LLRC) Report;” the Embassy had said. (Colombo Gazette) read more

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Malaysia urged to free activist arrested over Lankan film

Lena Hendry herself welcomed the international support she has received and added: “Screening a human rights documentary is not a crime. Being penalised for it is a serious infringement of my freedom of speech and expression. Films are a form of creative expression and a more effective way to increase awareness of issues around the world. There should no be restrictions whatsoever for that expression”.Leading filmmakers who signed the open letter include Academy Award winner, Laura Poitras; BAFTA winner, Joshua Oppenheimer; BAFTA fellow, Roger Graef; Emmy Award winner, Joslyn Barnes; Indian filmmaker, Anand Patwardha; Canadian filmmaker, Avi Lewis; Singaporean filmmaker, Tan Tan Pin; and Malaysian filmmaker, Hassan Muthalib.Film and TV executives supporting the letter include Channel 4 CEO, David Abraham; Channel 4 Head of News and Current Affairs, Dorothy Byrne; Sundance Institute Documentary Program Director, Tabitha Jackson; and BRITDOC CEO, Jess Search. Actor Greg Wise has also signed. (Colombo Gazette) The screening was raided by 30 officials from the Malaysian Home Ministry, the Police and Immigration officials. Ms Hendry, who is also Manager of Kuala Lumpur’s Freedom Film Festival, is charged under Malaysia’s Film Censorship law of 2002 which states that it is illegal for anyone to possess, distribute or show a film which has not been approved by the country’s censorship board. The signatories of the letter, who include many well known actors, directors and artists, including the rapper M.I.A, Grammy Award winning Angelique Kidjo and leading film directors from the US, India, Malaysia and the UK, including the director of No Fire Zone, Callum Macrae, as well as writers ranging from Naomi Klein to Meena Kandasamy, accuse the Malaysian authorities of using the law as an act of political censorship. Nearly 100 leading film-makers, writers, artists and lawyers from around the world have signed an open letter calling on the Malaysian government to drop charges against a human rights activist who is due to go on trial on Monday 14 December and could face up to three years in jail for screening a film on the war in Sri Lanka.Lena Hendry, of the Malaysian human rights NGO Pusat KOMAS, has been charged under Malaysia’s draconian censorship laws for screening the award-winning documentary No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka – a film about human rights abuses at the end of Sri Lanka’s civil war – to an invited audience in July 2013. The Emmy-nominated film which Lena is charged with showing, No Fire Zone, is now widely and internationally acknowledged to have played a key role in exposing the terrible war crimes committed at the end of the war in Sri Lanka. It also helped convince delegates to the UN Human Rights Council to launch a major inquiry into the events which saw tens of thousands of innocent Tamil civilians killed in the space of a few weeks – most by government shelling.The raid on the screening followed pressure from the then Sri Lankan government of President Mahinda Rajapaksa which is accused in the film of responsibility for war crimes. The director of the film, Callum Macrae, who was present at the 2013 screening in Kuala Lumpur when it was raided, said: “It is deeply ironic that the government of President Rajapaksa – which exerted such pressure on the Malaysian authorities to stop this screening – has now been replaced by popular vote of the Sri Lankan people, and many of its leading members are now facing investigation for war crimes and corruption. So history has vindicated the film, the government which it exposed has gone – yet Lena still potentially faces jail for showing it.” The letter – addressed to Malaysia’s Prime Minister, Najib bin Tun Abdul Razak, as well as the country’s Home Minister and Attorney General – calls for the dropping of the charges and the repealing of the act, noting: “The use of this draconian law to attack and prevent freedom of speech is disturbing, unacceptable and is in danger of bringing Malaysia into international disrepute.” read more

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Pakistan President seeks increase in security ties with Sri Lanka

The President said that both the countries need to increase their cooperation in the security and economic fields to further cement the friendly relations. Pakistan President Mamnoon Hussain says Pakistan attaches great importance to its relations with Sri Lanka, which are cordial and friendly.Talking to Speaker Karu Jayasuriya and his delegation comprising Minister of Budha Sasena, Justice and Labour Relations Dr. Wijedasa Rajapaksa, Senior Monks, Civil Servants and Academicians, he said that recent high-level exchanges have been very productive and are a testimony of dynamic cooperation between the two countries. Khewra Salt mine having total length of 300 km, width from 8 to 30 km and height from 2200ft to 4990ft, has also been called the ‘Natural Museum on the Earth’.The Sri Lankan delegates took keen interest in various sculptures of famous monuments of Pakistan prepared by salt rock inside the 17 storied mines, including Minar-e-Pakistan, Faisal Mosque, sheesh Mahal.The delegates were given a guided tour of the mines and the Asthma resort center. According to scientific rules and regulations 50 % of the salt is taken from the mines for consumption while the rest of 50 %, is left over so that it can work as a pillar to give support to the mine range. He said that that Pakistan and Sri Lanka have always maintained close, cordial and mutually supportive relations which are broad-based and multifaceted. He hoped that increased interaction at the government and people to people level will further consolidate the relationship between the two friendly countries.Earlier the delegation visited the world famous Khewra Salt mines which are world’s second largest source of edible salt located in Jhelum District, with estimated salt reserves of 600 million tons. Jayasooriya appreciated the efforts of the Government of Pakistan for the preservation of Buddhist heritage and historical sites in Pakistan, as well as for the cooperation being extended to the visiting Buddhist delegates. The high level delegation of Sri Lankan Buddhist Monks and eminent scholars is currently in Pakistan for a week-long visit aimed at introducing the rich Buddhist Gandhara heritage of Pakistan to the people of Sri Lanka as well as to revive the Gandhara trail. (Colombo Gazette) read more

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Gammanpila files petition against 20th Amendment to the Constitution

Parliamentarian Udaya Gammanpila filed a petition in court today against the 20th Amendment to the Constitution.The draft proposal of the 20th Amendment to the Constitution was presented to Parliament this week. Gammanpila, a member of the joint opposition, told the Supreme Court in his petition that the draft bill on the 20th Amendment to the Constitution was a violation of the Constitution.The 20th Amendment to the Constitution looks to abolish the Executive Presidency. (Colombo Gazette)

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Chinese Navy ship arrives in Colombo

A Chinese Navy ship arrived in Colombo on a goodwill visit, the Sri Lanka Navy said.The ‘Hai Yangdao’ of the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) arrived at the port of Colombo today and was welcomed by the Sri Lanka Navy in accordance with naval traditions. Meanwhile, two Japanese ships “Kaga” and “Inazuma” belonging to the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) which arrived in Sri Lanka on 30th September. left the Colombo harbour today after a successful visit.During their stay in the country, the crew members of the ships took part in a friendly Volleyball match and several other programmes organized by the Sri Lanka Navy. (Colombo Gazette) Upon its arrival at the Colombo harbour, the Commanding Officer of the ship, Commander Sha Qi met the Commander Western Naval Area, Rear Admiral Nishantha Ulugetenne at the Western Naval Command Headquarters and held a cordial discussion on matters of mutual interest. Mementoes were also exchanged to mark this occasion. Senior Colonel Xu Jianwei, Military, Naval and Air Attaché of the Embassy of China in Sri Lanka, was also present at the event. During the four-day visit, the ship’s crew is expected to visit some of the places of tourist attraction in the island and take part in several events organized by the Sri Lanka Navy.The 135m long and 18.6m wide this PLAN vessel has a displacement of 7,676 tons. The Chinese ship is scheduled to set sail from the Colombo harbour on Sunday. <span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span> read more

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India assures support to Sri Lanka to combat threat of Jihadi terrorism

High Commissioner also discussed the prevailing security situation with the Most Venerable Mahanayake theros and offered India’s full support to Sri Lanka in dealing with the common threat of Jihadi terrorism. The High Commissioner conveyed greetings on the auspicious occasion of Vesak to the Most Venerable Mahanayake Theros and recalled the visit of Prime Minister Shri Narendra Modi to Sri Lanka for the International Vesak Day celebration in 2017 and the exposition of the sacred Sarnath Relics in Sri Lanka in 2018. India has assured its fullest support to Sri Lanka to combat the threat of Jihadi terrorism.High Commissioner of India Taranjit Singh Sandhu paid respects at Sri Dalada Maligawa and received the blessings of the Most Venerable Thibbatuwawe Sri Sumangala Mahanayake Thero of Malwatte Chapter and Most Venerable Warakagoda Sri Gnanarathana Mahanayake Thero of Asgiriya Chapter in Kandy today. Both the Mahanayake Theros deeply appreciated India’s unconditional and strong support for Sri Lanka including in the security sphere.High Commissioner Sandhu also reviewed the progress of Kandyan Dancing School being constructed with Government of India’s assistance of around 150 million SLR at the Sri Lanka International Buddhist Academy(SIBA) campus in Pallekele, Kandy. read more

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Brock labour studies profs launch two new books

By: Carmela PatriasDespite acute labour shortages during the Second World War, Canadian employers – with the complicity of state officials – discriminated against workers of African, Asian, and Eastern and Southern European origin, excluding them from both white collar and skilled jobs. Jobs and Justice argues that, while the war intensified hostility and suspicion toward minority workers, the urgent need for their contributions and the egalitarian rhetoric used to mobilize the war effort also created an opportunity for minority activists and their English Canadian allies to challenge discrimination. A couple of Brock professors associated with the Centre for Labour Studies at the University are launching two new books.One of them looks at various important labour struggles in the Niagara region, and the other examines employment discrimination during wartime Canada, 1939-1945.Carmela Patrias (professor, History and Labour Studies) and Larry Savage (associate professor, Political Science and Labour Studies) will launch the books at an event happening at the Niagara Artists Centre (354 St. Paul St.) in downtown St. Catharines on Thursday, June 14 at 7 p.m.The book launch will feature short talks by both authors.This public event is free and copies of both books will be available for purchase.Union Power: Solidarity and Struggle in Niagara By: Carmela Patrias and Larry SavageFrom factory workers in Welland to retail workers in St. Catharines, from hospitality workers in Niagara Falls to migrant farm workers in Niagara-On-The-Lake, Union Power showcases the role of working people in the Niagara region. Charting the development of the region’s labour movement from the early nineteenth century to the present, Patrias and Savage illustrate how workers from this highly diversified economy struggled to improve their lives both inside and outside the workplace.–Jobs and Justice: Fighting Discrimination in Wartime Canada, 1939-1945 read more

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Horwath wins 77 in leadership review at NDP convention

About a thousand new democrats from across Ontario voted and an overwhelming majority decided that Andrea Horwath will remain party leader.There had been some question if she would stay on following the party’s showing in the election this past June.Horwath won 77% of the vote at the party’s convention in Toronto on Saturday.In her last speech to the NDP delegates she acknowledged there are concerns about the party’s third place finish in the election, which cost the NDP the balance of power when the liberals won a majority.Horwath said she’s focused on moving forward. read more

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Toddler missing on sleigh found by police in North Bay

A toddler has been found safe after a dog ran away with a sleigh and the two-year-old in tow.Around 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, a family was out for a walk in Redbridge, Ont. with their toddler in a sleigh tied to their dog. The dog ran into the bush with the sleigh and child and the family could not find them.They called police for help and members of the Emergency Response Team (E.R.T.), Canine Unit, and S.A.V.E. Unit (Snowmobile, All -Terrain Vehicle and Vessels Enforcement) assisted in the search.At 8 p.m. the child was located with her mother, who found the toddler and dog snagged around a tree.Officers safely brought the trio out of the bush via OPP ATV. No one was injured. read more

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Dundas man 48 killed in singlevehicle crash

A 48-year-old man has died after a single-vehicle collision in Dundas. It happened shortly after 6 p.m. Tuesday near the intersection of Valley and York roads.Police say the Dundas man was driving a Honda Civic westbound on York Rd. when he lost control and struck a large tree.Emergency crews transported the man to hospital where he later died. Police say the cause of the collision is still under investigation. This is the first driver death and the third overall fatality on Hamilton roads in 2018.Anyone with information about this crash is asked to contact Detective Constable Matt Hewko of the Collision Reconstruction Unit at 905-546-4755. read more

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WatchCanadian crude prices retain strength as Alberta production cuts kick in

“Government will be watching the way the industry responds, including the amount of storage being drawn down and the amount of oil nominated and apportioned on Enbridge (export pipelines) to help understand when and if the curtailment levels should be adjusted,” Dykstra said.The province said last month it would make “temporary adjustments” to January curtailment orders following criticism from some companies — including major producers Suncor Energy Inc. and Husky Energy Inc. — that said their levels had been set unfairly high or that they had concerns about employee safety and the long-term stability of their resources due to curtailing.Dykstra said those reductions have not significantly impacted the overall reduction target.Oilsands producer Pengrowth Energy Corp. used unspecified “options” provided by the government to reduce the cuts it was ordered to make, said spokesman Tom McMillan on Wednesday.“We feel the ministry has been fairly responsive in addressing some of those unintended consequences,” he said.“This all happened very quickly and so we’re still in the process of working through what it means for the industry. There are still a lot of unanswered questions.”He says better prices are helping Pengrowth’s bottom line but he still hopes the cutbacks end as soon as possible.PrairieSky Royalty Ltd. is also benefiting from higher prices, said CEO Andrew Phillips, noting it hasn’t had to make curtailments because it produces less than 10,000 bpd of oil.“Four Fridays ago, at the bottom, we had bitumen effectively trading at US$6 a barrel — we had WCS in the low teens,” he said.“And WCS two Fridays later, after the announcement of the curtailments, was at US$40.”The company holds petroleum mineral rights on millions of hectares in the four western provinces and earns a percentage of production from any wells drilled on those lands. CALGARY — Crude oil prices in Western Canada remained elevated on Wednesday, the day after provincially mandated oil production curtailments came into force, but a government spokesman says it’s too early to say how long the program will remain in place.The difference between Western Canadian Select bitumen-blend heavy oil and New York-traded West Texas Intermediate oil prices was about US$12.50 per barrel on Wednesday afternoon, according to Calgary oil brokerage Net Energy, an improvement over the US$17.52 per barrel average for spot contracts for January delivery signed last month.The WCS-WTI discount peaked at more than US$52 a barrel in October, a level at which the province estimated it was costing the Canadian economy more than $80 million per day. Steep discounts on this ‘forgotten commodity’ is costing Canada $23 million a day In 2018 oil went from portfolio stalwart to portfolio destroyer. Can it recover in 2019? ‘A made-in-Canada crisis’: How political stumbles, savvy activists brought the oilpatch to its knees But it recovered to traditional norms in the mid-teens or better after Alberta Premier Rachel Notley announced Dec. 2 that the province would impose curtailments of 325,000 barrels per day as of Jan. 1 to relieve a glut of oil in Western Canada and free up export pipeline space.The program, designed to remove about 8.7 per cent of total Alberta production from the market, was to remain in place for about three months and then be lowered to about 95,000 bpd through the rest of 2019.A total of 25 companies that each produce more than 10,000 barrels of oil per day in Alberta have been asked to cut production, confirmed government spokesman Matt Dykstra in an email on Wednesday.Alberta Premier Rachel Notley announced Dec. 2 that the province would impose curtailments of 325,000 barrels per day as of Jan. 1 to relieve a glut of oil in Western Canada and free up export pipeline space. Ben Nelms/Bloomberg read more

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Supreme Court says case against opticaldrive makers over pricefixing can go on

OTTAWA — The Supreme Court of Canada has given the green light to a pair of British Columbia class-action suits alleging a global price-fixing conspiracy by electronics firms.The suits, filed by Whistler, B.C., businessman Neil Godfrey, allege the companies overcharged buyers of optical disc drives and products containing them, such as computers and video-game consoles.The cases, involving more than 40 defendants, including powerhouses such as Sony, Toshiba, Samsung, Philips, Panasonic and Pioneer, were certified as class actions, decisions upheld on appeal.Godfrey is seeking compensation for all B.C. residents who purchased the products between Jan. 1, 2004, and Jan. 1, 2010.The proposed class also includes so-called umbrella purchasers — people who bought products that were not made or supplied by the companies in question — based on the theory that the conspiracy led other manufacturers to set higher prices as well.Godfrey launched the main action in September 2010, but a separate one against Pioneer did not come until August 2013, leading the company to argue it began after the expiry of a two-year limitation period.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 20, 2019. read more

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UN tribunal for former Yugoslavia hands down first genocide conviction

In rendering its judgement, Trial Chamber I of the Hague-based International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) said that it was “convinced beyond any reasonable doubt that a crime of genocide was committed in Srebrenica” and that Mr. Krstic was guilty of genocide. Reading the summary of the Sentencing Judgement, Presiding Judge Almiro Rodrigues said the Chamber was “doing its duty in meting out justice and, in this way, hopes to have contributed to creating a better world.” General Krstic was accused of genocide, complicity to commit genocide, persecution, extermination, murder and forced transfer or deportation and of crimes committed between July and November 1995 following the attack of the Serbian forces on the town of Srebrenica. At the time the attack was launched, General Krstic was the deputy commander of the Drina Corps, one of the corps which constitutes the army of Republika Srpska, often known as the VRS. At today’s Judgement hearing, Judge Rodrigues stressed the importance of distinguishing between what might be collective responsibility and individual responsibility, noting that the Tribunal had not been established to deal with collective responsibility. “What is of interest to me in each of the trials in which I have sat in this court is to verify whether the evidence presented before it makes it possible to find an accused guilty,” he said. “I seek to judge an accused. I do not judge a people.” The Judge acknowledged that in the former Yugoslavia there were attacks against civilian populations, massacres, and crimes of persecution – some of which were committed by Serbian forces. He said that to associate this evil with Serbian identity would be an insult to the Serbian people and would betray the concept of civil society. But it would be just as monstrous not to attach any name to the evil because that could be an offence to the Serbs, he added. “In July 1995, General Krstic, you agreed to evil,” Judge Rodrigues said. “This is why the Trial Chamber convicts you today and sentences you to 46 years in prison.”During the proceedings, the Chamber heard 128 witnesses and admitted 1,100 exhibits, some of which were hundreds of pages long. read more

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Deputy SecretaryGeneral to visit UN institutions in Italy

The Deputy Secretary-General will travel from 9 to 12 September to Turin, where she will visit the UN Staff College, the International Training Centre of the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the UN Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI).On 10 September, Ms. Fréchette will receive an honorary degree in Political Science from the University of Turin. Following the acceptance of her degree, she is expected to make a statement on globalization, the spokesman said.

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Hunger reduction rates slow down worldwide UN food agency warns

According to FAO’s annual report released on the eve of World Food Day, the number of hungry people declined in the 1990s by an average of 6 million a year. At that rate, says the report, State of Food Insecurity in the World 2001, it would take 60 years to reduce to 400 million the number of hungry people in the world, the target set for 2015 by the 1996 World Food Summit.”Clearly, there has been a slowdown in the reduction of undernourishment in the world,” FAO says, estimating that it would take an average annual decrease of 22 million to achieve the World Food Summit goal. The overall decline in the number of undernourished in the developing regions hides contrasting trends in different countries, the report says. Only 32 of the 99 developing countries studied recorded a decrease in the number of undernourished people between 1990-92 and 1997-99. In these 32 countries, 116 million people were moved out of the ranks of the undernourished. But, the number either did not fall or actually increased in the other developing countries for a total increase of 77 million people.The report notes that the “remarkable growth in food availability achieved in the developing countries more than halved the proportion of undernourished in the total population from 37 percent in the late 1960s to 17 percent at the end of the last century.” However, the decrease was not sufficient to halve the actual number of undernourished in the developing world, estimated at 956 million in 1969-71 and now as high as 777 million in 1997-99, FAO’s latest three-year average estimate.The report notes “a smaller increase in production would suffice if its growth were accompanied by more equitable access to food. This could be achieved through redistribution – of food itself, of the means of producing it or of the purchasing power needed to buy it – to those currently on the lower rungs of the food access ladder.”In connection with World Food Day, observed each year on 16 October, FAO and the European Parliament have organized a round-table discussion to evaluate results of global initiatives enacted by major development stakeholders as part of the World Food Summit goals. The talks will also look at food security issues, as well as initiatives undertaken by the agency’s specialized services in transboundary animal diseases. read more

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UNICEF ambassador and football star George Weah thanks UN for helping Liberia

Mr. Weah met Saturday with the chief of the UN Mission in Liberia (UNMIL), Jacques Paul Klein, who congratulated Mr. Weah for his outstanding commitment and dedication to children affected by the 14-year civil conflict. Mr. Klein also conveyed the UN’s deep appreciation for Mr. Weah’s visit to his home country at a time when peace has finally come to Liberia, but significant challenges remain. Mr. Klein indicated that as Liberia’s most beloved national hero, Mr. Weah would continue to play an important role in inspiring and motivating child ex-combatants to become “useful and productive citizens.” The UN would be ready to assist the young people once they’ve laid down their weapons, Mr. Klein said. “The talent is in Liberia. Liberia is full of wonderful, decent people; they just lack the opportunity,” he said, adding that through the programmes being offered by the UN, young Liberians could acquire education and training to enable them to play a constructive role in the rebirth of the country. Mr. Weah thanked the UN for coming to Liberia’s aid in its hour of need and making it safe and stable. He challenged all Liberians to come together to help the UN in its search for lasting peace, and called on all child combatants to disarm. “Once they are willing, we just need to be prepared to help them after they lay down their arms,” Mr. Weah said, adding, “The UN is taking a good step to help them get back to school.” Mr. Klein and Mr. Weah pledged to collaborate on future projects benefiting Liberia’s war-affected youth. read more

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Bolivia Annan selects senior official as focal point for mustering worldwide help

Mr. Ocampo will travel to Bolivia – his first mission is scheduled to begin tomorrow and run until Thursday – to review the situation in the country, hold talks with government leaders, national figures and international organizations, and report back to the Secretary-General.Following his visit to Bolivia and neighbouring countries in November, and a request for assistance from the Bolivian Government, Mr. Annan selected Mr. Ocampo for the role, UN spokeswoman Marie Okabe said today.Bolivia is one of the poorest countries in its region, ranking 114th on the UN Development Programme’s (UNDP) Human Development Index last year. Almost 15 per cent of the population survive on less than $1 a day.Since late December heavy rains in the Andean nation, especially in the northern departments, have left thousands of people homeless and damaged crop lands and infrastructure. In addition, UN agencies say there has been a surge in the number of cases of dengue fever. read more

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Economic insecurity fosters world full of anxiety and anger – UN report

Only 8 per cent of people – fewer than one in 10 – live in countries providing favourable economic security, according to the survey produced by the International Labour Organization (ILO). A socio-economic safety net, rather than income level, not only promotes personal well-being, happiness and tolerance but also benefits growth, development and social stability, it says.”Unless we can make our societies more equal and the global economy more inclusive, very few will achieve economic security or decent work,” ILO Director-General Juan Somavia said in connection with the study’s release in Geneva. The report marks the first attempt to measure global economic security as perceived by ordinary people and was based on detailed household and workplace surveys covering over 48,000 workers and more than 10,000 workplaces worldwide. Survey results paint a mixed global picture, showing that some lower-income countries achieve higher levels of economic security than certain rich nations. South and South-East Asia have a greater share of global economic security – 14 per cent – than their share of world income – 7 per cent. By contrast, Latin American States provide their citizens with less economic security. Other key findings of the survey include:The most important determinant of national happiness is the extent of income security, measured in terms of income protection and a low degree of income inequality.Employment security is diminishing almost everywhere, due to the informalization of economic activities, outsourcing and regulatory reforms.Job security – defined as a position with good prospects of satisfying work and a career – is weak in most countries. Women usually experience more employment insecurity on average than men and face more types of insecurity. Political democracy and civil liberties significantly increase economic security but economic growth has only a weak impact on security over the longer-term. read more

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